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2,4-D Amine Antagonism by Salts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

John D. Nalewaja
Affiliation:
Crop and Weed Sci. Dep., N. D. State Univ., Fargo, ND 58105
Zenon Woznica
Affiliation:
Crop and Weed Sci. Dep., N. D. State Univ., Fargo, ND 58105
Robert Matysiak
Affiliation:
Crop and Weed Sci. Dep., N. D. State Univ., Fargo, ND 58105

Abstract

Research was conducted to determine the influence of salts on 2,4-D toxicity to kochia. Calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and iron salts except for sulfate and phosphate salts of calcium and sodium were antagonistic to 2,4-D diethanolamine. None of the ammonium salts antagonized 2,4-D control of kochia. Effects of individual ions generally antagonistic to 2,4-D were additive when in mixture. 2,4-D generally controlled kochia better when mixed with various acids than with their ammonium salts in distilled, sodium bicarbonate, or ferric sulfate water carriers, relating to the lower pH with the acids. However, low pH was not essential in overcoming salt antagonism of 2,4-D for kochia control, nor was 2,4-D always effective with low pH. Sulfate and monobasic phosphate anions were most effective in overcoming sodium bicarbonate and calcium chloride antagonism of 2,4-D. The concentration of diammonium sulfate needed to overcome sodium bicarbonate antagonism of 2,4-D increased with sodium bicarbonate concentration. Diammonium sulfate at 2% (w/v) overcame 1200 mg L–1 sodium as sodium bicarbonate. Nonionic surfactants and oil adjuvants also overcame antagonism of 2,4-D caused by water from several sources.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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