Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-x2fkq Total loading time: 0.268 Render date: 2022-11-30T15:23:09.809Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Response of 98140 Corn With Gat4621 and hra Transgenes to Glyphosate and ALS-Inhibiting Herbicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Jerry M. Green*
Affiliation:
Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Stine-Haskell Research Center Building 210, P.O. Box 30, Newark, DE 19714
Theresa Hale
Affiliation:
Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Stine-Haskell Research Center Building 210, P.O. Box 30, Newark, DE 19714
Margaret A. Pagano
Affiliation:
Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Stine-Haskell Research Center Building 210, P.O. Box 30, Newark, DE 19714
John L. Andreassi II
Affiliation:
DuPont Crop Protection, Stine-Haskell Research Center Building 300, P.O. Box 30, Newark, DE 19714
Steven A. Gutteridge
Affiliation:
DuPont Crop Protection, Stine-Haskell Research Center Building 300, P.O. Box 30, Newark, DE 19714
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: jerry.m.green@pioneer.com

Abstract

The transgenic corn line 98140 has a high level of resistance to glyphosate and all five chemical classes of herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase (ALS). The dual herbicide resistance is due to a molecular stack of two constitutively expressed genes: gat4621, which produces a glyphosate acetyltransferase that rapidly inactivates glyphosate, and hra, which produces a highly resistant ALS. On a rate basis, the positive 98140 isoline with a single copy of the gat4621 gene is over 1,000-fold more resistant to glyphosate than a negative isoline without the transgene. Similarly, the positive 98140 isoline with the hra gene is over 1,000-fold more resistant to ALS-inhibiting herbicides such as chlorimuron and sulfometuron at the whole-plant and enzyme level. The gat4621 and hra genes do not change the natural tolerance of corn to selective herbicides, so new corn hybrids based on 98140 will give growers more options to manage weeds and delay the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds.

Type
Physiology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Literature Cited

Bedbrook, J. R., Chaleff, R. S., Falco, S. C., Mazur, B. J., Somerville, C. R., and Yadav, N. S., inventors. E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company, assignee 1995 Jan 3. Nucleic acid fragment encoding herbicide resistant plant acetolactate synthase. U.S. patent 5,378,824.Google Scholar
Bogoslavsky, L. and Neumann, P. M. 1998. Rapid regulation by acid pH of cell wall adjustment and leaf growth in maize plants responding to reversal of water stress. Plant Physiol. 118:701709.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bradford, M. M. 1976. A rapid and sensitive method for the quantization of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Anal. Biochem. 72:248254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
CaJacob, C. A., Feng, P. C. C., Reiser, S. E., and Padgette, S. R. 2007. Inhibitors of 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate 3-phosphase synthase (EPSPS). Pages 290302. in. W. Krämer and U. Schirmer, eds. Modern Crop Protection Compounds. Weinheim, Germany Wiley-VCH.Google Scholar
Castle, L. A., Siehl, D. L., Gorton, R., et al. 2004. Discovery and directed evolution of a glyphosate tolerance gene. Science. 304:11511154.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Degli Agosti, R., Jouve, L., and Greppin, H. 1997. Computer-assisted measurements of plant growth with linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensors. Arch. Sci. Genève. 50:233244.Google Scholar
Dill, G. M., CaJacob, C. A., and Padgette, S. R. 2008. Glyphosate-resistant crops: adoption, use and future considerations. Pest Manag. Sci. 64:326331.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Franz, J. E., Mao, M. K., and Sikorski, J. A. 1996. Glyphosate: a unique global herbicide. Washington, DC American Chemical Society. 653.Google Scholar
Green, J. M. 1998. Differential tolerance of corn (Zea mays) inbreds to four sulfonylurea herbicides and bentazon. Weed Technol. 12:474477.Google Scholar
Green, J. M. and Cahill, W. R. 2003. Enhancing nicosulfuron activity with pH adjusters. Weed Technol. 17:338345.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Green, J. M., Hazel, C. B., Forney, D. R., and Pugh, L. M. 2008. New multiple-herbicide crop resistance and formulation technology to augment the utility of glyphosate. Pest Manag. Sci. 64:332339.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Koeppe, M. K., Hirata, C. M., Brown, H. M., Kenyon, W. H., O'Keefe, D. P., Lau, S. C., Zimmerman, W. T., and Green, J. M. 2000. Basis of selectivity of the herbicide rimsulfuron in maize. Pestic. Biochem. Physiol. 66:170181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ness, J. E., Kim, S., Gottman, A., Pak, R., Krebber, A., Borchert, T. V., Govindarajan, S., Mundorff, E. C., and Minshull, J. 2002. Synthetic shuffling expands functional protein diversity by allowing amino acids to recombine independently. Nat. Biotechnol. 20:12511255.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ray, T. 1984. Site of action of chlorsulfuron. Plant Physiol. 75:827831.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Russell, M. H., Saladini, J. L., and Lichtner, F. 2002. Sulfonylurea herbicides. Pestic. Outlook. 13:166173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siehl, D. L., Castle, L. A., Groton, R., and Keenan, R. J. 2007. The molecular basis of glyphosate resistance by an optimized microbial acetyltransferase. J. Biol. Chem. 282:11461155.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Singh, B. K., Stidham, M. A., and Shaner, D. L. 1988. Assay of acetohydroxyacid synthase. Anal. Biochem. 171:173179.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Streibig, J. C., Rudemo, M., and Jensen, J. E. 1993. Dose–response curves and statistical models. Pages 3055. in Streibig, J. C. and Kudsk, P. Herbicide Bioassays. Boca Raton, FL CRC.Google Scholar
Stuebler, H., Kraehmer, H., Hess, M., Schulz, A., and Rosinger, C. 2008. Global changes in crop production and impact trends in weed management—an industry view. Proc. 5th Int. Weed Sci. Congr. 1:309319.Google Scholar
Tan, S. Y., Evans, R. R., Dahmer, M. L., Singh, B. K., and Shaner, D. L. 2005. Imidazolinone-tolerant crops: history, current status and future. Pest Manag. Sci. 61:246257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tang, A.-C. and Boyer, J. S. 2008. Xylem tension affects growth-induced water potential and daily elongation of maize leaves. J. Exp. Bot. 59:753764.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, M. E. 2007. Acetohydroxyacid synthase inhibitors (AHAS/ALS): biochemistry of the target and resistance. Pages 2745. in Krämer, W. and Schirmer, U. Modern Crop Protection Compounds. Weinheim, Germany Wiley-VCH.Google Scholar
Tranel, P. J. and Wright, T. R. 2002. Resistance of weeds to ALS-inhibiting herbicides: what have we learned. Weed Sci. 50:700712.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Response of 98140 Corn With Gat4621 and hra Transgenes to Glyphosate and ALS-Inhibiting Herbicides
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Response of 98140 Corn With Gat4621 and hra Transgenes to Glyphosate and ALS-Inhibiting Herbicides
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Response of 98140 Corn With Gat4621 and hra Transgenes to Glyphosate and ALS-Inhibiting Herbicides
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *