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Phylogenetic Relationship of Echinochloa Species Based on Simple Sequence Repeat and Phenotypic Marker Analyses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Eun-Jung Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Gyoungju Nah
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Min-Jung Yook
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Soo-Hyun Lim
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Tae-Sun Park
Affiliation:
National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, Wanju, Jeollabuk-do, 55365, Korea
DoKyoung Lee*
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Do-Soon Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: dosoonkim@snu.ac.kr

Abstract

Echinochloa species are among the most troublesome weeds in rice cultivation, and grow in a broad habitat range in Korea. Although various ecotypes of Echinochloa have been collected as germplasm for future studies, it has been difficult to classify them due to their high level of morphological similarity. This study was thus conducted to develop and investigate the phylogenetic relationships between 77 Echinochloa accessions with the use of 23 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 24 morphological traits. Of 77 Echinochloa accessions, including 57 accessions from Korea and 5 reference species, late watergrass was clearly clustered as a distinctive group from barnyardgrass and other Echinochloa species. In this analysis, we also identified core genetic and morphological markers that can be used for the future identification and classification of Echinochloa species. Five out of 23 SSR makers produced distinctive bands that discriminate late watergrass from barnyardgrass and other Echinochloa species. Four morphological traits of the reproductive organs were the most influential contributors for classifying Echinochloa species. Although there was no clear consensus generated in this study between SSR markers and morphological trait analyses, our results support the potential use of the selected SSR markers and morphological traits in future studies of Echinochloa.

Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

Current address: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801

The first and second authors contributed equally to this work.

Associate Editor for this paper: William Vencill, University of Georgia.

References

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