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Longevity of Witchweed (Striga asiatica) Seed

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Faiz F. Bebawi
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agric., Univ. of Khartoum, Shambat, Sudan
Robert E. Eplee
Affiliation:
USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Whiteville Methods Development Center, P.O. Box 279, Whiteville, NC 28472
Claude E. Harris
Affiliation:
USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Whiteville Methods Development Center, P.O. Box 279, Whiteville, NC 28472
Rebecca S. Norris
Affiliation:
USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Whiteville Methods Development Center, P.O. Box 279, Whiteville, NC 28472

Abstract

Witchweed (Striga asiatica Lour. ♯4 STRLU) seed remained viable for 6 yr under open-shelf laboratory conditions and for 14 yr when deep buried under field conditions. Seed kept in normal atmosphere of the laboratory for < 1 through 6 yr had the following germination percentages: 2, 95, 95, 94, 83, 38, and 7. Newly harvested seed will not germinate because of postmaturity ripening requirements. There were no viable seed after 7 yr of shelf storage in the laboratory. Seed buried in the field gave 60 to 90% germination the first season after production. Annual recovery and testing showed a gradual reduction in viability to 10% at year 14 for the deepest buried seed; shallower buried seed expired sooner. No germination occurred thereafter.

Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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