Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-9hf5z Total loading time: 0.48 Render date: 2023-02-07T03:00:43.067Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Genetic Relationships between Tropical Sprangletop (Leptochloa virgata) Populations from Mexico: Understanding Glyphosate Resistance Spread

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Ricardo Alcántara-de la Cruz*
Affiliation:
Agricultural Chemistry and Edaphology, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain
Yolanda Romano
Affiliation:
Agrarian Research Center “Finca La Orden Valdesequera”, 60187, Badajoz, Spain
María Dolores Osuna-Ruíz
Affiliation:
Agrarian Research Center “Finca La Orden Valdesequera”, 60187, Badajoz, Spain
José Alfredo Domínguez-Valenzuela
Affiliation:
Agricultural Parasitology, Chapingo Autonomous University, 56230 Chapingo, Mexico
Julio Menéndez
Affiliation:
Agroforestry Sciences, University of Huelva, 21819, Huelva, Spain
Rafael De Prado
Affiliation:
Agricultural Chemistry and Edaphology, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: g12alalr@uco.es

Abstract

The susceptibility to glyphosate and genetic diversity based on intersimple sequence repeat markers were characterized for 17 tropical sprangletop populations collected from two separate regions mainly in Persian lime groves in Veracruz, Mexico. The whole-plant dose response together with shikimic acid assays indicated different levels of glyphosate resistance in those populations. Genetic diversity values (h) estimated using POPGENE ranged from 0.119 to 0.198 and 0.117 to 0.214 within susceptible and resistant populations, respectively. The average genetic diversity (HS) within the susceptible populations was 0.157, and the total genetic diversity (HT) was 0.218. The HS of the resistant populations was 0.144, and the HT was 0.186. The analysis of molecular variance based on the response to glyphosate indicated that most of the genetic variation was found within groups of susceptible and resistant populations (90% of the genetic variation), whereas 10% or less was among groups. The high level of genetic diversity between glyphosate-resistant tropical sprangletop populations from distant and adjacent locations is likely due to both short- and long-distance seed dispersal and independent evolutionary events in tropical sprangletop populations among Persian lime groves in Veracruz.

Type
Physiology/Chemistry/Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by the Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Associate Editor for this paper: Muthukumar V. Bagavathiannan, Texas A&M.

References

Literature Cited

Aagaard, JE, Krutovskii, KV, Strauss, SH (1998) RAPDs and allozymes exhibit similar levels of diversity and differentiation among populations and races of Douglas-fir Heredity 81:6978 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alarcón-Reverte, R, García, A, Urzúa, J, Fischer, AJ (2013) Resistance to glyphosate in junglerice (Echinochloa colona) from California Weed Sci 61:4854 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alcántara-de la Cruz, R, Barro, F, Domínguez-Valenzuela, JA, De Prado, R (2016) Physiological, morphological and biochemical studies of glyphosate tolerance in Mexican Cologania [ Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC.]) Plant Physiol Biochem 98:7280 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Amrhein, N, Deus, B, Gehrke, P, Steinrücken, HC (1980) The site of inhibition of the shikimate pathway by glyphosate: II Interference of glyphosate with chorismate formation in vivo and invitro. Plant Physiol 66:830834 Google ScholarPubMed
Benvenuti, Dinelli G, Bonetti, A (2004) Germination ecology of Leptochloa chinensis: a new weed in the Italian agroenvironment Weed Res. 44:8796 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bogdan, AV, Pratt, DJ (1967) Reseeding Denuded Pastoral Land in Kenya. Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry. 48 pGoogle Scholar
Bornet, B, Branchard, M (2001) Nonanchored intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers: reproducible and specific tools for genome fingerprinting Plant Mol Biol Report 19:209215 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brosnan, JT, Breeden, JK, Mueller, TC (2012) A glyphosate-resistant biotype of annual bluegrass in Tennessee Weed Sci 60:97100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burgos, NR, Tranel, PJ, Streibig, JC, Davis, VM, Shaner, D, Norsworthy, JK, Ritz, C (2013) Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels Weed Sci 61:420 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cromartie, TH, Polge, ND (2002) Method of detecting shikimic acid. U.S. patent 006482654B1Google Scholar
De Carvalho, LB, Cruz-Hipólito, H, González-Torralva, F, Da Costa Aguiar Alves, PL, Christoffoleti, PJ, De Prado, R (2011) Detection of sourgrass (Digitaria insularis) populations resistant to glyphosate in Brazil Weed Sci 59:171176 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Carvalho, LB, Alves, P, Gonzalez-Torralva, F, Cruz-Hipolito, HE, Rojano-Delgado, AM, De Prado, R, Gil-Humanes, J, Barro, F, Luque de Castro, MD (2012) Pool of resistance mechanisms to glyphosate in Digitaria insularis J Agric Food Chem 60:615622 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Délye, C, Michel, S, Bérard, A, Chauvel, B, Brunel, D, Guillemin, JP, Dessaint, F, Le Corre, V (2010) Geographical variation in resistance to acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides across the range of the arable weed Alopecurus myosuroides Huds (black-grass). New Phytol 186:10051017 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duke, SO (2011) Glyphosate degradation in glyphosate-resistant and -susceptible crops and weeds J Agric Food Chem 59:58355841 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Duke, SO, Baerson, S R, Rimando, AM (2003) Herbicides: glyphosate. in Plimmer, JR, Gammon, DW, Ransdale, NN, eds. Encyclopedia of Agrochemicals. New York: John Wiley & Sons. http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/047126363X.agr119. Accessed March 21, 2016Google Scholar
Duke, SO, Powles, SB (2008) Glyphosate: a once-in-a-century herbicide Pest Manag Sci 64:319–25CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Excoffier, L, Smouse, PE, Quattro, JM (1992) Analysis of molecular variance inferred from metric distances among DNA haplotypes: application to human mitochondrial DNA restriction sites Genetics 131:479491 Google Scholar
Ge, X, d'Avignon, DA, Ackerman, JJH, Collavo, A, Sattin, M, Ostrander, EL, Hall, ELL, Sammons, RD, Preston, C (2012) Vacuolar glyphosate-sequestration correlates with glyphosate resistance in ryegrass (Lolium spp.) from Australia, South America and Europe: a 31P-NMR investigation J Agric Food Chem 60:12431250 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
González-Torralva, F, Gil-Humanes, J, Barro, F, Brants, I, De Prado, R (2012) Target site mutation and reduced translocation are present in a glyphosate-resistant Lolium multiflorum Lam population from Spain. Plant Physiol Biochem 58:1622 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Häfliger, E, Scholz, H (1981) Grass Weeds 2. Varese, Italy: Ciba Geigy Google Scholar
Haney, R, Senseman, S, Hons, F (2002) Effect of Roundup Ultra on microbial activity and biomass from selected soils J Environ Qual 31:730735 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heap, I (2016) International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds. http://www.weedscience.com. Accessed March 18, 2016Google Scholar
Henry, WB, Shaner, DL, West, MS (2007) Shikimate accumulation in sunflower, wheat, and proso millet after glyphosate application Weed Sci 55:15 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huanfu, C, Song, X, Qiang, Q (2009) ISSR variation within and among wild Brassica juncea populations: implication for herbicide resistance evolution Genet Resour Crop Evol 56:913924 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Imaizumi, T, Kataoka, Y, Ogata, S, Uchino, A (2013) Genetic diversity within and between sulfonylurea resistant and susceptible populations of Schoenoplectus juncoides in Japan Weed Res 53:290298 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jasieniuk, M, Brûlé-Babel, AL, Morrison, IN (1996) The evolution and genetics of herbicide resistance in weeds Weed Sci 44:176193 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maxwell, BD, Roush, ML, Radosevich, SR (1990) Predicting the evolution and dynamics of herbicide resistance in weed populations Weed Technol 4:213 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Menchari, YD, Elye, C, Corre, VLE (2007) Genetic variation and population structure in black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds.), a successful, herbicide resistant, annual grass weed of winter cereal fields Mol Ecol 16:3161–172CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Menéndez, J, Bastida, F, De Prado, R (2006) Resistance to chlortoluron in a downy brome (Bromus tectorum) biotype Weed Sci 54:237245 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nei, M (1973) Analysis of gene diversity in subdivided populations Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 70:33213323 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nybom, H, Bartish, I (2000) Effects of life history traits and sampling strategies on genetic diversity estimates obtained with RAPD markers in plants Perspect Plant Ecol Evol Syst 3:93114 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Orcaray, L, Zulet, A, Zabalza, A, Royuela, M (2012) Impairment of carbon metabolism induced by the herbicide glyphosate Journal of Plant Physiology 169:2733 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Osuna, MD, Okada, M, Ahmd, R, Fischer, AJ, Jasienuik, M (2011) Genetic diversity and spread of thiobencarb resistant early watergrass (Echinochloa oryzoides) in California Weed Sci 59:195201 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peakall, R, Smouse, PE (2006) GenAlEx 6: genetic analysis in Excel Population genetic software for teaching and research. Mol Ecol Notes 6:288295.Google Scholar
Pérez-López, M, González-Torralva, F, Cruz-Hipólito, H, Santos, F, Domínguez-Valenzuela, JA, De Prado, R (2014) Characterization of glyphosate-resistant tropical sprangletop (Leptochloa virgata) and its alternative chemical control in Persian lime orchard in Mexico Weed Sci 62:441450 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peterson, PM, Romaschenko, K, Snow, N, Johnson, G (2012) A molecular phylogeny and classification of Leptochloa (Poaceae: Chloridoideae: Chlorideae) sensu lato and related genera Ann Bot-London 109:13171329 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Saes, LH, Aparecida, E, de Oliveira, RS, Kremer, RJ, Ferrarese-Filho, O (2010) Glyphosate affects lignin content and amino acid production in glyphosate-resistant soybean Acta Physiol Plant 32:831837 Google Scholar
Seefeldt, SS, Jensen, JE, Fuerst, EP (1995) Log-logistic analysis of herbicide dose–response relationships Weed Technol 9:218227 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siehl, DL (1997) Inhibitors of EPSP synthase, gluthamine synthetase and histidine synthesis. Pages 3767 in Roe, RM, Burton, JD, Kuhr, RJ, eds. Herbicide Activity: Toxicology, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology. Amsterdam: OIS Press Google Scholar
Snow, N (1997) Phylogeny and systematics of Leptochloa P. Beauv. sensu lato (Poaceae, Chloridoideae, Eragrostideae). Ph.D dissertation. St. Louis, MO: Washington University Google Scholar
Snow, N, Peterson, PM, Giraldo-Cañas, D (2008) Leptochloa (Poaceae: Chloridoideae) in Colombia. J Bot Res Inst Texas 2:861874 Google Scholar
Wiersema, R, Burns, M, Hershberger, D (2013) Glyphosate Pathway Map. http://umbbd.ethz.ch/gly/gly_map.html. Accessed January 28, 2016Google Scholar
Yeh, FC, Yang, RC, Boyle, TBJ, Ye, ZH, Mao, JX (2001) POPGENE, the User-Friendly Shareware for Population Genetic Analysis. http://www.ualberta.ca/∼fyeh/popgene.html. Accessed March 30, 2016Google Scholar
5
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Genetic Relationships between Tropical Sprangletop (Leptochloa virgata) Populations from Mexico: Understanding Glyphosate Resistance Spread
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Genetic Relationships between Tropical Sprangletop (Leptochloa virgata) Populations from Mexico: Understanding Glyphosate Resistance Spread
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Genetic Relationships between Tropical Sprangletop (Leptochloa virgata) Populations from Mexico: Understanding Glyphosate Resistance Spread
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *