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Diverse Rotations and Optimal Cultural Practices Control Wild Oat (Avena fatua)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

K. Neil Harker*
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Lacombe Research Centre, 6000 C & E Trail, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada T4L 1W1
John T. O'Donovan
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Lacombe Research Centre, 6000 C & E Trail, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada T4L 1W1
T. Kelly Turkington
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Lacombe Research Centre, 6000 C & E Trail, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada T4L 1W1
Robert E. Blackshaw
Affiliation:
AAFC, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1
Newton Z. Lupwayi
Affiliation:
AAFC, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1
Elwin G. Smith
Affiliation:
AAFC, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1
Eric N. Johnson
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A8
Denis Pageau
Affiliation:
AAFC, Normandin, Quebec, Canada G8M 4K3
Steven J. Shirtliffe
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A8
Robert H. Gulden
Affiliation:
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N
John Rowsell
Affiliation:
University of Guelph, New Liskeard, Ontario, Canada P0J 1P0
Linda M. Hall
Affiliation:
twelfth author: Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2P5
Christian J. Willenborg
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A8
*
Corresponding author's E-Mail: neil.harker@agr.gc.ca

Abstract

In western Canada, more money is spent on wild oat herbicides than on any other weed species, and wild oat resistance to herbicides is the most widespread resistance issue. A direct-seeded field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2014 at eight Canadian sites to determine crop life cycle, crop species, crop seeding rate, crop usage, and herbicide rate combination effects on wild oat management and canola yield. Combining 2× seeding rates of early-cut barley silage with 2× seeding rates of winter cereals and excluding wild oat herbicides for 3 of 5 yr (2011 to 2013) often led to similar wild oat density, aboveground wild oat biomass, wild oat seed density in the soil, and canola yield as a repeated canola–wheat rotation under a full wild oat herbicide rate regime. Wild oat was similarly well managed after 3 yr of perennial alfalfa without wild oat herbicides. Forgoing wild oat herbicides in only 2 of 5 yr from exclusively summer annual crop rotations resulted in higher wild oat density, biomass, and seed banks. Management systems that effectively combine diverse and optimal cultural practices against weeds, and limit herbicide use, reduce selection pressure for weed resistance to herbicides and prolong the utility of threatened herbicide tools.

Type
Weed Management
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor for this paper: Adam Davis, USDA-ARS.

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