Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.23 Render date: 2021-12-09T01:23:31.986Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Regional specialization in the eye of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta: Blue sensitivity of the ventral retina

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2009

Ruth R. Bennett
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston
Richard H. White
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston
Jeffery Meadows
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston

Abstract

The compound eye of the tobacco hornworm moth Manduca sexta contains green-, blue-, and ultraviolet-sensitive photoreceptors. Electroretinogram spectral-sensitivity measurements were recorded from different regions of the retina in order to broadly map the distribution of the three receptor types. The relative contribution of the three receptors to spectral-sensitivity curves was estimated by fitting theoretical curves based on the absorption spectra of the three rhodopsins. This analysis indicated that the dorsal retina is green and ultraviolet dichromatic, with green-sensitive cells greatly predominating. The ventral retina is trichromatic with a substantial population of blue- and ultraviolet-sensitive receptors. We previously showed that flower visitation for nectar feeding is mediated mainly by blue-sensitive cells. Their localization in the ventral retina seems an appropriate adaptation of the receptor mosaic, since the moths hover above flowers as they feed.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Arikawa, K., Inokuma, K. & Eguchi, E. (1987). Pentachromatic visual system in a butterfly. Naturwissenschaften 74, 297298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bennett, R.R. (1983). Circadian rhythm of visual sensitivity in Manduca sexta and its development from an ultradian rhythm. Journal of Comparative Physiology A 150, 165174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bennett, R.R. & Brown, P.K. (1985). Properties of the visual pigments of the moth Manduca sexta and the effects of two detergents, digitonin and CHAPS. Vision Research 25, 17711781.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bennett, R.R. & White, R.H. (1989). Influence of carotenoid deficiency on visual sensitivity, visual pigment and P-face particles of photoreceptor membrane in the moth Manduca sexta. Journal of Comparative Physiology A 164, 321331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bennett, R.R. & White, R.H. (1991). 11-cis retinal restores visual function in vitamin A-deficient Manduca. Visual Neuroscience 6, 473479.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bernard, G.D. & Remington, C.L. (1991). Color vision in Lycaena butterflies: Spectral tuning of receptor arrays in relation to behavioral ecology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.A. 88, 27832787.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chase, M.R., Bennett, R.R. & White, R.H. (1996). Expression of opsin mRNA in normal and vitamin A-deficient retinas of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta. Visual Neuroscience 13, 353358.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cutler, D.E., Bennett, R.R., Stevenson, R.D. & White, R.H. (1995). Feeding behavior in the nocturnal moth Manduca sexta is mediated mainly by blue receptors, but where are they located in the retina? Journal of Experimental Biology 198, 19091917.Google Scholar
Dafni, A. & Kevan, P.G. (1995). Hypothesis on adaptive features of the compound eye of bees: Flower-specific specializations. Evolutionary Ecology 9, 236241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ephrussi, B. & Beadle, G.W. (1936). A technique of transplantation for Drosophila. American Naturalist 70, 218225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hardie, R.C. (1986). The photoreceptor array of the dipteran retina. Trends in Neurosciences 9, 419423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hardie, R.C., Franceschini, N., Ribi, W. & Kirschfeld, K. (1981). Distribution and properties of sex-specific photoreceptors in the fly Musca domestica. Journal of Comparative Physiology A 145, 139152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hausen, K. & Strausfeld, N.J. (1980). Sexually dimorphic interneuron arrangements in the fly visual system. Proceedings of the Royal Society B (London) 208, 5771.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ichikawa, T. & Tateda, H. (1982). Distribution of color receptors in the larval eyes of four species of Lepidoptera. Journal of Comparative Physiology A 149, 317324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelber, A. & Varjú, D. (1995). Flower size and flower patterns: Preferences and learning in Macroglossum stellatarum (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae). In Learning and Memory. Proceedings of the 23rd Göttingen Neurobiology Conference, Vol. 1, ed. Elsner, N. & Menzel, R., p. 50. Stuttgart: G. Thieme Verlag.Google Scholar
Labhart, T. (1996). How polarization-sensitive interneurones of crickets perform at low degrees of polarization. Journal of Experimental Biology 199, 14671475.Google Scholar
Marshall, N.J., Land, M.F., King, C.A. & Cronin, T.W. (1991). The compound eyes of mantis shrimps (Crustacea, Hoplocarida, Stomatopoda). II. Colour pigments in the eyes of stomatopod crustaceans: Polychromatic vision by serial and lateral filtering. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (London) 334, 5784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Menzel, J., Wunderer, H. & Stavenga, D.G. (1991). Functional morphology of the divided compound eye of the honeybee drone (Apismèllifera). Tissue and Cell 23, 525535.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scherer, C. & Kolb, G. (1987 a). Behavioral experiments on the visual processing of color stimuli in Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera). Journal of Comparative Physiology A 160, 645656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scherer, C. & Kolb, G. (1987 b). The influence of color stimuli on visually controlled behavior in Aglais urticae L. and Pararge aegeria L. (Lepidoptera). Journal of Comparative Physiology A 161, 891898.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snyder, A.W., Menzel, R. & Laughlin, S.B. (1973). Structure and function of the fused rhabdom. Journal of Comparative Physiology 87, 99135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stavenga, D.G. (1992). Eye regionalization and spectral tuning of retinal pigments in insects. Trends in Neurosciences 15, 213218.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wehrhahn, C. (1979). Sex-specific differences in the chasing behaviour of houseflies (Musca). Biological Cybernetics 32, 239241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
White, R.H., Brown, P.K., Hurley, A.K. & Bennett, R.R. (1983). Rhodopsins, retinula cell ultrastructure and receptor potentials in the developing pupal eye of the moth Manduca sexta. Journal of Comparative Physiology A 150, 153163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
White, R.H., Stevenson, R.D., Bennett, R.R., Cutler, D.E. & Haber, W.A. (1994). Wavelength discrimination and the role of ultraviolet vision in the feeding behavior of hawkmoths. Biotropica 26, 427435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Regional specialization in the eye of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta: Blue sensitivity of the ventral retina
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Regional specialization in the eye of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta: Blue sensitivity of the ventral retina
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Regional specialization in the eye of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta: Blue sensitivity of the ventral retina
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *