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Patients with Schizophrenia Remember that an Event has Occurred, but not When

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Lydia Rizzo
Affiliation:
INSERM Unité 405, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Jean-Marie Danion
Affiliation:
INSERM Unité 405, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Martial Van Der Linden
Affiliation:
Service de Neuropsychologie, Boulevard du Rectorat, B33, B-4000 Liège 1, Belgique
Danielle Grangé
Affiliation:
Centre National Universitaire Sud de Calcul, 950 rue de Saint Priest, BP 7229, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 4, France

Abstract

Background

The context memory deficit hypothesis of schizophrenia postulates that the long-term deficit associated with this disorder is related to a memory impairment for contextual information.

Method

To test this hypothesis, memory for temporal context was assessed in 33 patients with schizophrenia and 33 normal subjects, using a recency discrimination task.

Results

Whereas patients were able to recall and recognise target items, they were unable to recognise from among the target items those which had been most recently learned.

Conclusions

Schizophrenia is associated with a temporal context memory deficit.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1996 

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References

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Patients with Schizophrenia Remember that an Event has Occurred, but not When
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