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Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy in Schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2018

John L. Waddington*
Affiliation:
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin
Eadbhard O'Callaghan
Affiliation:
Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Institute of Psychiatry, London
Conall Larkin
Affiliation:
Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, Blackrock, Co. Dublin
Oonagh Redmond
Affiliation:
Institute of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin
John Stack
Affiliation:
Institute of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin
Joseph T. Ennis
Affiliation:
Institute of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin
*
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland

Extract

In this new era of structural and functional neuroimaging technologies, it is the unsurpassed anatomical resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (Andreasen, 1989; and Besson, this supplement) that has resulted in a new generation of studies on cerebral morphology in schizophrenia. With the recent development of whole-body magnets of very high (⩾ 1.5T) and uniform field strength, it has become possible to extend the scope of this approach to include measurement of certain fundamental neurochemical processes, via magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS: Hubesch et al, 1989; Lock et al, this supplement). The purpose of this article is to introduce and review critically the existing literature on the application of MRI and MRS to schizophrenia, and to give a preliminary account of some of our own recent studies in these areas.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1990 

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