Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-w9nzq Total loading time: 0.352 Render date: 2021-08-05T19:48:22.083Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Correlations Between Akathisia and Residual Psychopathology: A By-product of Neuroleptic-Induced Dysphoria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

John W. Newcomer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4940 Children's Place, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
L. Stephen Miller
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens GA
William O. Faustman
Affiliation:
Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA, and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA
Martin W. Wetzel
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine
George P. Vogler
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine
John G. Csernansky
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA

Abstract

Patients developing neuroleptic-induced akathisia have been reported to show higher levels of psychopathology. We sought to replicate this finding and determine its symptom specificity. We confirmed a significant relationship between ratings of akathisia and total score on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) during both acute and maintenance neuroleptic treatment. Using stepwise regression models, BPRS anxious-depressive subscale scores were the strongest predictors of akathisia during both treatment conditions. Paranoid subscale scores predicted akathisia only during maintenance treatment. These results suggest that neuroleptic-induced dysphoria largely explains the relationship between akathisia and residual psychopathology during both acute and maintenance neuroleptic treatment.

Type
Short papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Barnes, T. R. E. & Braude, W. M. (1985) Akathisia variants and tardive dyskinesia. Archives of General Psychiatry, 42, 874878.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gerlach, J. (1979) Tardive dyskinesia. Danish Medical Bulletin, 26, 209254.Google ScholarPubMed
Levinson, D. F., Simpson, G. M., Singh, H., et al (1990) Fluphenazine dose, clinical response, and extrapyramidal symptoms during acute treatment. Archives of General Psychiatry, 47, 761768.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marder, S. R., Van Putten, T., Mintz, J., et al (1984) Costs and benefits of two doses of fluphenazine. Archives of General Psychiatry, 41, 10251029.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Newcomer, J. W., Riney, S. J., Vinogradov, S., et al (1992) Plasma prolactin and homovanillic acid as markers for psychopathology and abnormal movements after neuroleptic dose decrease. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 28, 101107.Google ScholarPubMed
Overall, J. E. (1974) A Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale in psychopharmacology research. In Psychological Measurements in Psychopharmacology, Modern Problems in Pharmacopsychiatry, Volume 7 (ed. Pichot, P.), pp. 6778. Basel: Karger.Google Scholar
Petrie, E. C., Faustman, W. O., Moses, J. A., et al (1990) Correlates of rapid neuroleptic response in male patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research, 33, 171177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spitzer, R. L., Endicott, J. & Robins, E. (1978) Research diagnostic criteria: Rationale and reliability. Archives of General Psychiatry, 35, 773791.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Putten, T. & May, P. R. A. (1978) Subjective response as a predictor of outcome in pharmacotherapy. Archives of General Psychiatry, 35, 477480.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Putten, , Marder, S. R., May, P. R. A., et al (1985) Plasma levels of haloperidol and clinical response. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 21, 6972.Google ScholarPubMed
Van Putten, , Marder, S. R., & Mintz, J. (1990) A controlled dose comparison of haloperidol in newly admitted schizophrenic patients. Archives of General Psychiatry, 47, 754758.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
18
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Correlations Between Akathisia and Residual Psychopathology: A By-product of Neuroleptic-Induced Dysphoria
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Correlations Between Akathisia and Residual Psychopathology: A By-product of Neuroleptic-Induced Dysphoria
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Correlations Between Akathisia and Residual Psychopathology: A By-product of Neuroleptic-Induced Dysphoria
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *