Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-klmjj Total loading time: 0.532 Render date: 2021-09-19T18:24:43.696Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The progenitors of planetary nebulae

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 August 2017

P. te Lintel Hekkert
Affiliation:
Mt. Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories
A. A. Zijlstra
Affiliation:
Kapteyn Laboratorium, Groningen

Extract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Based on a new sample of (IRAS based) OH/IR stars (te Lintel Hekkert et al., 1991, A&AS, in press), and a catalogue of planetary nebulae compiled by Acker (1983, A&AS, 54, 315), we show the relation between these two groups of objects, in terms of the kinematics and the Galactic distribution. In contrast with earlier analyses of samples of OH/IR stars, we find a close correlation between the kinematics of the planetary nebulae and the IRAS based sample of OH/IR stars. In particular, we find that the distribution of the planetary nebulae (PN) shows a good correlation with the OH/IR stars which have a low outflow velocity (v exp < 12.5 km s–1). Whether the high outflow velocity OH/IR stars also have a counterpart among PN is not clear.

Type
Abstracts
Copyright
Copyright © Kluwer 
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The progenitors of planetary nebulae
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The progenitors of planetary nebulae
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The progenitors of planetary nebulae
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *