Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-vl2kb Total loading time: 0.16 Render date: 2021-11-27T15:40:52.039Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

SOME SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL CORRELATES OF INTERGENERATIONAL SOCIAL MOBILITY: EVIDENCE FROM THE WEST OF SCOTLAND COLLABORATIVE STUDY

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2001

DAVID BLANE
Affiliation:
Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Science, Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, Charing Cross Campus, London W6 8RP, UK
GEORGE DAVEY SMITH
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, UK
CAROLE HART
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health, University of Glasgow, UK
Get access

Abstract

Mainstream sociological studies of intergenerational social mobility have emphasised social factors such as education and the material and cultural resources of the family of origin as the main influences on the chances and direction of social mobility. Medical sociology in contrast has been more interested in its physical correlates such as height and health status. Data from the West of Scotland Collaborative study allow an examination of the relationship between social mobility and both social and physical factors. Height, education and material circumstances in the family of origin, indexed as the number of siblings, were each independently associated with the chances of both upward and downward social mobility in this dataset. In each case the net effect of this social mobility was to constrain the social distribution of these variables. Any role which these factors may play in indirect health selection, it is argued, cannot account for social class differences in adult health.

Type
RESEARCH NOTE
Copyright
1999 BSA Publications Ltd

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

SOME SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL CORRELATES OF INTERGENERATIONAL SOCIAL MOBILITY: EVIDENCE FROM THE WEST OF SCOTLAND COLLABORATIVE STUDY
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

SOME SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL CORRELATES OF INTERGENERATIONAL SOCIAL MOBILITY: EVIDENCE FROM THE WEST OF SCOTLAND COLLABORATIVE STUDY
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

SOME SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL CORRELATES OF INTERGENERATIONAL SOCIAL MOBILITY: EVIDENCE FROM THE WEST OF SCOTLAND COLLABORATIVE STUDY
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *