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Sugarbeet seed priming: solubilization of the basic subunit of 11-S globulin in individual seeds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

Sophie Bourgne
Affiliation:
Laboratoire Mixte CNRS/Aventis (UMR1932), Aventis CropScience, 14–20 rue Pierre Baizet, 69263, Lyon CEDEX 9, France
Claudette Job
Affiliation:
Laboratoire Mixte CNRS/Aventis (UMR1932), Aventis CropScience, 14–20 rue Pierre Baizet, 69263, Lyon CEDEX 9, France
Dominique Job
Affiliation:
Laboratoire Mixte CNRS/Aventis (UMR1932), Aventis CropScience, 14–20 rue Pierre Baizet, 69263, Lyon CEDEX 9, France
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Priming of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) seeds induces increased solubilization of the basic B-subunit of 11-S globulin (a major seed storage protein in sugarbeet). Using a sensitive single-seed ELISA, the soluble and total B-subunit contents of individual untreated and primed sugarbeet seeds were measured. With the untreated seeds, there was a 160-fold range of the soluble B-subunit content among individual seeds. The individual primed seeds also exhibited large variations in their soluble B-subunit content, yet only over a five-fold range. Furthermore, the frequency distributions of soluble B-subunit content were markedly different for the primed and untreated seed populations; the primed seed population exhibited a substantially higher median than that for the untreated seed population. In marked contrast, and as expected from results with pooled seed samples, the distributions of total B-subunit content were superimposed when comparing untreated and primed seed populations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000

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