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Manipulation of desiccation-sensitive axes of wampee (Clausena lansium) to facilitate increased dehydration tolerance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

J.R. Fu*
Affiliation:
School of Life Science, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275, People's Republic of China
X.M. Huang
Affiliation:
School of Life Science, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275, People's Republic of China
S.Q. Songa
Affiliation:
School of Life Science, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275, People's Republic of China
*
*Fax: +86-20-84036215 Email: lssfjr@zsu.edu.cn

Abstract

The plumules of newly-excised wampee embryos, which are more sensitive to dehydration than the roots, became more resistant to water loss when axes were allowed to sprout on woody plant medium [WPM; McCown and Lloyd (1981) Hortscience16, 453] before being dried. Pre-treatment of sprouting axes (seedlings) with sucrose incorporated in the WPM enhanced survival. Although the roots withered following further dehydration of seedlings cultured on WPM containing 60% sucrose, excised plumules were capable of generating adventitious roots when a combination of 10 mM α-napthaleneacetic acid and 10 mM indole-3-butyric acid was used during subsequent in vitro incubation.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000

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Manipulation of desiccation-sensitive axes of wampee (Clausena lansium) to facilitate increased dehydration tolerance
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