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Disciplined by the Discipline: A Social-Epistemic Fingerprint of the History of Science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2015

Raf Vanderstraeten
Affiliation:
Ghent University, Belgium E-mail: raf.vanderstraeten@ugent.be
Frederic Vandermoere
Affiliation:
University of Antwerp, Belgium E-mail: frederic.vandermoere@uantwerpen.be

Argument

The scientific system is primarily differentiated into disciplines. While disciplines may be wide in scope and diverse in their research practices, they serve scientific communities that evaluate research and also grant recognition to what is published. The analysis of communication and publication practices within such a community hence allows us to shed light on the dynamics of this discipline. On the basis of an empirical analysis of Isis, we show how the process of discipline-building in history of science has led its practitioners to be socialized and sensitized in relatively strong intra-disciplinary terms – with minimal interdisciplinary openness.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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