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Passion for the Art of Morally Responsible Technology Development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2019

Sabine Roeser*
Affiliation:
Sabine Roeser and Steffen Steinert, Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section, Department of VTI, Faculty of TPM, Delft University of Technology
Steffen Steinert
Affiliation:
Sabine Roeser and Steffen Steinert, Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section, Department of VTI, Faculty of TPM, Delft University of Technology
*
Corresponding author: Sabine Roeser, s.roeser@tudelft.nl

Abstract

In this article, we discuss the importance of emotions for ethical reflection on technological developments, as well as the role that art can play in this. We review literature that argues that emotions can and should play an important role in the assessment and acceptance of technological risk and in designing morally responsible technologies. We then investigate how technologically engaged art can contribute to critical, emotional-moral reflection on technological risks. The role of art that engages with technology is unexplored territory and gives rise to many fascinating philosophical questions that have not yet been sufficiently addressed in the literature.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal Institute of Philosophy and the contributors 2019 

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References

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71 Hanson, Louise, ‘The Reality of (Non-Aesthetic) Artistic Value’, The Philosophical Quarterly 63 (2013), 492508CrossRefGoogle Scholar; Lopes, Dominic M., ‘The Myth of (Non-aesthetic) Artistic Value’, The Philosophical Quarterly 61 (2011), 518–36CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

72 Sauchelli, A., ‘Aesthetic Value, Artistic Value, and Morality’, in Coady, D., Brownlee, K., Lipper-Rasmussen, K. (eds), Blackwell Companion to Applied Philosophy (Malden, Oxford: Blackwell, 2016), 514526CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

73 Kieran, Mathew, ‘Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value’, Philosophy Compass 1 (2006), 129–43CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

74 Op. cit. note 62, 4.

75 van de Poel, I. and Doorn, N.Ethical Parallel Research: A Network Approach for Moral Evaluation’, in Doorn, N., Schuurbiers, D., van de Poel, I., Gorman, M. (eds) Early engagement and new technologies: Opening up the laboratory (Dordrecht: Springer, 2013)Google Scholar.

76 Work for this article has been funded by the project ‘Developing socially responsible innovations: The role of values and moral emotions’ funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), programme Responsible Innovation; project number: MVI-14-048.

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