Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-xbgml Total loading time: 0.256 Render date: 2022-08-13T10:40:39.247Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Towards a unified understanding of basic notions and terms in humanoid robotics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2006

M. Vukobratović
Affiliation:
Institute Mihajlo Pupin, 11000-Belgrade, Volgina 15, Serbia E-mail: vuk@robot.imp.bg.ac.yu
B. Borovac
Affiliation:
University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, 21000-Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovića 6, Serbia E-mail: borovac@uns.ns.ac.yu
V. Potkonjak
Affiliation:
University of Belgrade, faculty of Electrical Engineering, 11000-Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, Serbia E-mail: potkonjak@yahoo.com

Abstract

The intention of this paper is to contribute towards a unified understanding of the basic notions and terms in the domain of humanoid robotics, having in mind that the same notions are sometimes interpreted in different ways (some interpretations are contradictory, and some even erroneous). Hence, the first part of the paper is devoted to defining some basic notions, walk and gait being among the first. Then, the paper deals with the notion of dynamic balance and stability, particularly the difference between them, since these essentially different notions are often confused and, rarely, regarded as identical. As dynamic balance is directly related to the notion of zero-moment point (ZMP), it was necessary to touch upon some misunderstandings concerning the ZMP. Gait stability is an especially delicate category, as humanoid locomotion systems have certain specific features that are not possessed by other systems. Namely, because of external disturbances, there may appear unpowered (passive) degrees of freedom that cause loss of dynamic balance. Hence, these unpowered degrees of freedom cannot be overlooked in the stability analysis. As the stability of motion of humanoid robots is inseparably linked with control, it was also necessary to pay due attention to this notion. Finally, the paper ends with a discussion of posture and postural stability with all their specificities. The authors hope that this paper will contribute to a clearer understanding of the basic notions of humanoid robotics, especially concerning robots with high dynamic and control performances.

Type
Article
Copyright
2006 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
29
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Towards a unified understanding of basic notions and terms in humanoid robotics
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Towards a unified understanding of basic notions and terms in humanoid robotics
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Towards a unified understanding of basic notions and terms in humanoid robotics
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *