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Experimental results on the nonlinear control via quasi-LPV representation and game theory for wheeled mobile robots

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2009

Roberto S. Inoue
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, C.P. 359, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970, Brazil.
Adriano A. G. Siqueira
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, Brazil.
Marco H. Terra
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, C.P. 359, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970, Brazil.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

In this paper, nonlinear dynamic equations of a wheeled mobile robot are described in the state-space form where the parameters are part of the state (angular velocities of the wheels). This representation, known as quasi-linear parameter varying, is useful for control designs based on nonlinear approaches. Two nonlinear controllers that guarantee induced 2-norm, between input (disturbances) and output signals, bounded by an attenuation level γ, are used to control a wheeled mobile robot. These controllers are solved via linear matrix inequalities and algebraic Riccati equation. Experimental results are presented, with a comparative study among these robust control strategies and the standard computed torque, plus proportional-derivative, controller.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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References

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