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Design and realization of a snake-like robot system based on a spatial linkage mechanism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2008

Na Li
Affiliation:
College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, P.R. China
Tieshi Zhao*
Affiliation:
College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, P.R. China
Yanzhi Zhao
Affiliation:
College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, P.R. China
Yongguang Lin
Affiliation:
College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, P.R. China
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: tszhao@ysu.edu.cn

Summary

This paper presents a novel model of snake-like robots based on a spatial linkage mechanism. The reasonable structural parameters of the mechanism are obtained by performing a kinematic simulation. Then the kinematics of the spatial linkage mechanism is developed and the motor angles of the robot for performing lateral undulation are analyzed based on the Serpenoid curve. The torque of servomotors at each moment is also obtained. The experiments detailed in this paper confirm that the robot is of the ability to realize several motion modes, including lateral undulation, left and right turning motions, and uplifting of the head.

Type
Article
Information
Robotica , Volume 27 , Issue 5 , September 2009 , pp. 779 - 788
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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