Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-kkbsd Total loading time: 0.272 Render date: 2022-01-24T16:36:34.559Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Nutritional aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 February 2002

RJ Norman
Affiliation:
Reproductive Medicine Unit, The University of Adelaide, Australia
L Moran
Affiliation:
Reproductive Medicine Unit, The University of Adelaide, Australia Division of Human Nutrition, CSIRO, Adelaide, Australia
MJ Davies
Affiliation:
Reproductive Medicine Unit, The University of Adelaide, Australia
Get access

Abstract

There is ample evidence from animal and human observations that extremes of body weight influence reproductive processes. Women who are under a certain weight or body mass index are less likely to cycle regularly, have more difficulty in getting pregnant and have smaller babies. Those who are overweight also suffer serious reproductive problems in that they have a greater risk of oligo- or amenorrhoea, infertility and gestational diabetes. Several large epidemiological studies indicate that reproduction is adversely affected by excess weight. Two of the largest studies (Nurses' Health Study and the British Birth Cohort Study) that convincingly show that being overweight impairs menstrual and fertility function indicate that the greater the body weight and body mass index (BMI), the more significant the effect. Being overweight in adolescence appears to affect reproductive function later in life.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Nutritional aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Nutritional aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Nutritional aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *