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Relative impacts of health and obesity on US household servings of fruits and vegetables

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 February 2017

Teresa Briz*
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Ronald W. Ward
Affiliation:
Food and Resource Economics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
Leonardo E. Ortega
Affiliation:
National Mango Board, Orlando, Florida, USA
*
*Corresponding author: teresa.briz@upm.es

Abstract

Discrete choice models estimated over a large household database, show the impacts of demographics, household behavior, health status, obesity issues and prices on household servings of fruits and vegetables. These impacts are ranked from the most to least effects on daily servings. A major result is the importance of obesity and calorie issues relative to other major demand drivers.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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