Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-ljdsm Total loading time: 0.158 Render date: 2021-07-29T13:33:20.107Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The Adaptation of a Shakespearean Genre: Othello and Ford's Tis Pity She's a Whore

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2018

Raymond Powell
Affiliation:
The University of Reading

Extract

O Thello's Popularity in the Early seventeenth century is indicated both by the frequency of its revival and by its influence over many of the dramatists of the period. It seems to have exerted a lasting hold over Ford's imagination, the effects traceable in three plays written at different stages in his career: The Queen, published anonymously in 1653 but now generally reckoned to be an early work, Love's Sacrifice (1633), and The Lady's Trial (1638). The extent and significance of the influence ofOthello on Love's Sacrifice has been much discussed. In the words of one commentator, “So close are the parallels with Othello in the middle scenes of the action that it is tempting to imagine that Ford wrote with a copy of the play at his side.

Type
Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Renaissance Society of America 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, Donald K. Jr. John Ford. New York, 1972.Google Scholar
Barton, Anne. “He that plays the King: Ford's Perkin Warbeck and the Stuart History Play.” In Drama: Forms and Development, ed. Alston, M. and Williams, R., 6993. Cambridge, 1977.Google Scholar
Barton, Anne “Oxymoron and the Structure of Ford's The Broken Heart.” Essays and Studies 33 (1980): 70-94.Google Scholar
Bradbrook, M. C. Themes and Conventions of Elizabethan Tragedy. 2d ed. Cambridge, 1980.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brodwin, Leonora Leet. Elizabethan Love Tragedy 1587-1625. New York and London 1972.Google Scholar
Butler, Martin. “Love's Sacrifice: Ford's Metatheatrical Tragedy.” In John Ford Critical Re-Visions, ed. Neill, Michael, 201-31. Cambridge, 1988.Google Scholar
Champion, Larry S. “Ford's ‘Tis Pity She's a Whore and the Elizabethan Tragic Perspective.“ PMLA 90 (1975): 78-87.Google Scholar
Dent, R. W. John Webster's Borrowing. Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1960.Google Scholar
Farr, Dorothy M. John Ford and the Caroline Theatre. London, 1979.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ford, John, ‘Tis Pity She's a Whore, ed. Derek Roper. Manchester, 1975.Google Scholar
Frost, David L. The School of Shakespeare. Cambridge, 1968.Google Scholar
Gentleman, Francis. The Dramatic Censor I. London, 1770.Google Scholar
Gurr, Andrew. “Singing Through the Chatter: Ford and Contemporary Theatrical Fashion.” In John Ford Critical Re-Visions, ed. Michael Neill, 81-96. Cambridge, 1988.Google Scholar
Homan, Sidney J. Jr. “Shakespeare and Dekker as the Keys to Ford's ‘Tis Pity She's a Whore.Studies in English Literature 7 (1967): 269-76.Google Scholar
Leech, Clifford. John Ford and the Drama of His Time. London, 1957.Google Scholar
Lomax, Marion. Stage Images and Traditions: Shakespeare to Ford. Cambridge, 1987.Google Scholar
Neill, Michael, “ ‘What Strange Riddle's This?': Deciphering ‘Tis Pity She's a Whore.” In John Ford Critical Re-Visions, ed. Neill, Michael, 153-79.Google Scholar
Oliver, H. J. The Problem of John Ford. Melbourne, 1955.Google Scholar
Putt, S. Gorley. The Golden Age of English Drama. London and Totowa, NJ, 1981.Google Scholar
Ribner, Irving. “ ‘By Nature's Light': The Morality of ‘Tis Pity She's a Whore.” Tulane Studies in English 10 (1960): 39-50.Google Scholar
Rosenberg, Marvin. The Masks of Othello. Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1961.Google Scholar
Sargeaunt, Joan M. John Ford. Oxford, 1935.Google Scholar
Shakespeare, William. Othello, ed. Alexander, Peter. London and Glasgow, 1951.Google Scholar
Shakespeare, William. The Rape ofLucrece, ed. Alexander, Peter. London and Glasgow, 1951.Google Scholar
Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet, ed. Peter Alexander. London and Glasgow, 1951.Google Scholar
Smallwood, R. L. “ ‘Tis Pity She's a Whore and Romeo and Juliet.” Cahiers Misabitains Etudes sur la Pre-Renaissance et la Renaissance Anglaises 20 (1981): 49-70.Google Scholar
Stavig, Mark. John Ford and the Moral Order. Madison and London, 1968.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Adaptation of a Shakespearean Genre: Othello and Ford's Tis Pity She's a Whore
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Adaptation of a Shakespearean Genre: Othello and Ford's Tis Pity She's a Whore
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Adaptation of a Shakespearean Genre: Othello and Ford's Tis Pity She's a Whore
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *