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Social sin, social redemption

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2019

KATHRYN POGIN
Affiliation:
Yale Law School, 127 Wall St., New Haven, CT 06511, USA Department of Philosophy, Northwestern University, Kresge 3512, 1880 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

Eleonore Stump's Atonement marks a significant advance in atonement theory, especially in its nuanced approach to ethical and relational complexities, but tends to treat sin as social only insofar as one individual's sin can harm or shame another. I argue that that social sin requires social redemption and that exemplarism would provide a solution. Christ's pursuit of love and justice, in the midst of oppression, temptation, and struggle, offers a distinctive model of virtue, towards collective restoration of the world. While we cannot redeem ourselves, in calling us to effect justice and union with one another, God may also call us closer to Godself.

Type
Book Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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