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Mini-Radiocarbon Measurements, Chemical Selectivity, and the Impact of Man on Environmental Pollution and Climate *

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Lloyd A Currie
Affiliation:
National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC 20234
George A Klouda
Affiliation:
National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC 20234
John A Cooper
Affiliation:
Oregon Graduate Center, Beaverton, Oregon 97005
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Abstract

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Underlying principles and results are presented for our program to use isotopic and chemical methods to quantify anthropogenic and natural sources of carbonaceous pollutants. Radiocarbon data have been obtained with a specially-developed miniature low-level gas counting system which has permitted us to assay samples containing as little as 5mg carbon. Measurements of carbonaceous particles, using chemical selectivity and size fractionation to supplement the radiocarbon data, have revealed major impact from both fossil fuel and vegetative (contemporary) sources on urban aerosols. Residential wood-burning has been specifically identified as an important source of respirable particles. Current investigations are directed toward the carbonaceous gases and the application of the accelerator technique for the assay of radiocarbon in individual chemical fractions containing microgram quantities of carbon.

Type
Man-Made 14C Variations
Copyright
Copyright © The American Journal of Science 

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