Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-klj7v Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-03-04T16:25:50.380Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

The Bunya in Queensland's Forests

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2016

Get access

Extract

Much publicity has been given over the past decade to the discovery of the Wollemi pine (Wollemia nobilis) north of Sydney and its status as a ‘living fossil’. It is not generally realised that the bunya (Araucaria bidwillii), a unique part of Queensland's forests, has a similar status. The tree is the last surviving species of the section Bunya of the genus Araucaria. This section was more diverse and widespread during the Mesozoic, (Table 1), with some species having cone morphology similar to A. bidwillii appearing during the Jurassic with fossils extending into the northern hemisphere.

Type
Special Issue: On The Bunya Trail
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Notes

1 Woodford, J., The Wollemi Pine: the Incredible Discovery of a Living Fossil from the Age of the Dinosaurs, (Melbourne: Text Publishing, 2000).Google Scholar

2 Hill, R. S., ‘Conifer origin, evolution and diversification in the southern hemisphere’ in Enright, N. J. Hill, R. S. eds., Ecology of the Southern Conifers, (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1995), 1029.Google Scholar

3 Boland, D. J. et al. , Forest Trees of Australia (Melbourne: Nelson/CSIRO, 1984), 4243.Google Scholar

4 Pers. Comm. McDonald, W. J., Queensland Herbarium, Brisbane, 1999.Google Scholar

5 Pers. Comm. Bowden, J., Pine Rivers Shire Council, 2002.Google Scholar

6 Pers. Comm McDonald, W. J..Google Scholar

7 Nikles, D. G., ‘Realized and potential gains from using and conserving genetic resources of Araucaria’, in Forestry Problems of the Genus Araucaria (Brazil: FUPEF, 1980), 8795.Google Scholar

8 Butler, D. W. (in prep.), Dispersal, growth form and distribution in subtropical rainforest plants, PhD. Thesis, Department of Botany, University of Queensland, Brisbane.Google Scholar

9 Butler, Dispersal, growth form and distribution.Google Scholar

10 Webb, L. J. Tracey, J. G., ‘Australian rainforests: patterns and change’ in Keast, A. ed., Ecological Biogeography of Australia, (The Hague: Junk., 1981), 163297.Google Scholar

11 Bond, W. J., ‘The Tortoise and the hare: ecology of angiosperm dominance and gymnosperm persistence’, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 36 (1989): 227249.Google Scholar

12 Moloney, L., An assessment of the condition of Bunya Pine Araucaria bidwillii in Bunya Mountains National Park, south-east Queensland, G.Dip. project, UNE, Armidale, 1998; A. Ewart and A. Grenfell, Cainozoic volcanic centres in southeastern Queensland, with special reference to the Main Range, Bunya Mountains and the volcanic centres of the northern Brisbane coastal region, Pap. Dep. Geol. Univ. Queensland 11 (3) (1985): 1–57; DME, Gympie Special -1: 100 000 Geological Series, Department of Mines and Energy, Brisbane, 1998; DME Nambour Special -1: 100 000 Geological Series, Department of Mines and Energy, Brisbane, 1998; Geological Survey of Queensland, Gympie-1: 250 000 Geological Series. Department of Mines and Energy: Brisbane, 1975; Geological Survey of Queensland, Caboolture-1: 100 000 Geological Series, Department of Mines and Energy, Brisbane, 1979.Google Scholar

13 Pers. Comm. Goosem, S., Wet Tropics Management Authority, Cairns, 2000.Google Scholar

14 Smith, I. R. (in prep). Ecology and growth of the bunya pine (Araucaria Bidwillii Hook), PhD. Thesis, Department of Botany, University of Queensland, Brisbane.Google Scholar

15 Boland, et al. , Forest Trees of Australia.Google Scholar

16 Boland, et al. , Forest Trees of Australia. Google Scholar

17 Enright, N. J., ‘Conifers of tropical Australasia’ in Ecology of the Southern Conifers, Enright, N. J. Hill, R. S. eds., (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1995), 197222.Google Scholar

18 Hutley, L. B., Doley, D., Yates, D. J., Boonsaner, A., ‘Water balance of an Australian subtropical rainforest at altitude: the ecological and physiological significance of intercepted cloud and fog’, Australian Journal of Botany 45 (1997): 311329.Google Scholar

19 Smith, , Ecology and growth of the bunya pine.Google Scholar

20 Hill, R. S., Jordan, G. J. McPhail, M. K., ‘History and paleoecology of Australian Nothofagus Forests’ in Veblen, T. T., Hill, R. S. , and Read, J. eds., The Ecology and Biogeography of Nothofagus Forests (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996); Hopkins M. S., HeadJ. et al, ‘Evidence of a Holocene and continuing recent expansion of lowland rain forest in humid tropical North Queensland’, Journal of Biogeography 23 (1996): 737–745; M. K. McPhail, N. F. Alley, E. M. Truswell and I. R. K. Sluiter, ‘Early Tertiary vegetation: evidence from spores and pollen’ in R. S. Hill ed., History of the Australian Vegetation: Cretaceous to Recent, (Melbourne: Cambridge University Press 1994), 189–261; H. A. Martin, ‘Australian tertiary phytogeography: evidence from palynology’, in R. S. Hill ed., History of the Australian Vegetation: Cretaceous to Recent, (Melbourne: Cambridge University Press 1994), 104–142.Google Scholar

21 Hill ‘Conifer origin, evolution and diversification’.Google Scholar

22 Read, J., ‘Ecology of Australian Nothofagus forests’ in Veblen, T. T., Hill, R. S. Read, J. eds., The Ecology and Biogeography of Nothofagus Forests, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996).Google Scholar

23 Pers. Comm. A. Gardener, retired Forest Manager; Bribie Island, 2000.Google Scholar

24 Owens, internal memo, Dept. of Forestry, Queensland, 1948.Google Scholar

25 Pers. Comm. P. I. Forster, Queensland Herbarium, Brisbane, 2000.Google Scholar

26 Pers. Comm. R. Kooyman, Alstonville, NSW, 2000.Google Scholar

27 Forget, P., ‘Seed dispersal of Voucapoua america by cavimorph rodents in French Guiana’, J. Tropical Ecology 6 (1990): 459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

28 Sullivan, H., Aboriginal gatherings in south east Queensland, BA Honours Thesis, Dept. of Prehistory and Anthropology, ANU, Canberra, 1977.Google Scholar

29 Huth, J., The bunya pine: the romantic Araucaria of Queensland, International Araucariaceae Symposium, Auckland, 2002.Google Scholar

30 Sanguinetti, J., Maresca, L. et al. , Estimation of gross production of pinons by the araucaria-(Araucaria araucana) in the forests of Lanin National Park-Argentin, International Araucariaceae Symposium, Auckland, 2002.Google Scholar

31 Burrows, G. E. Stockey, R. A., ‘The developmental anatomy of cryptogeal germination in Bunya Pine (Araucaria bidwillii)’, Int. J. Plant Science 155 5 (1994): 519537; DoleyD., ‘Utilisation of intrinsic water in the germination of Araucaria bidwillii seeds’, Seed Sci. Technol. 18 (1990): 33–42; R. J. Haines, ‘Embryo development and anatomy in Araucaria Juss’, Australian Journal of Botany 31 (1983): 125–140; R. J. Haines, ‘Seed development in Araucaria Juss’, Australian Journal of Botany 31 (1983): 255–267.Google Scholar

32 Burrows, Stockey, , ‘The developmental anatomy of cryptogeal germination’.Google Scholar

33 Pers. Comm., Gardner.Google Scholar

34 Forster, P. I., Bostock, P. D., Bird, L. H. Bean, A. R., Vineforest Plant Atlas for South-East Queensland, (Brisbane: Queensland Herbarium, 1991).Google Scholar

35 Butler, Dispersal, growth form and distribution.Google Scholar

36 Ebbett, R. L. Ogden, J., ‘Comparative seedling growth of five endemic New Zealand podocarp species under different light regimes’, New Zealand Journal of Botany 36 (1998): 189201; Ebbett, R. L. Ogden, J., ‘The Southern conifers – a synthesis’ in Enright, N. J. Hill, R. S. eds., Ecology of the Southern Conifers, (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1995): 271–287; T. T. Veblen, ‘Regeneration patterns in Aracauria araucana forests in Chile’, Journal of Biogeography 9 (1982): 11–28.Google Scholar

37 Petrie, C. C., Tom Petrie's Reminiscences of Early Queensland, (St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1904, 1992 reprint): 247259.Google Scholar

38 Pers. comm., Gardner.Google Scholar

39 Fensham, R. J. Fairfax, R. J., ‘The grassy balds of the Bunya Mountains, south-eastern Queensland. Floristics and conservation’, Cunninghamia 4 (1996): 511523; L. J. Webb, ‘An historical interpretation of the grass balds of the Bunya Mountains, south Queensland’, Ecology 45 (1964): 159–162.Google Scholar

40 Moloney, L., An assessment of the condition of Bunya Pine; Pers. Comm. G. Pegg, Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Brisbane, 2002.Google Scholar

41 Kuschel, G., ‘Weevils (Curculionidea) in male strobili of Araucariaceae’, International Araucariaceae Symposium, Auckland, 2002.Google Scholar