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A speleothem record of seasonality and moisture transport around the 8.2 ka event in Central Europe (Vacska Cave, Hungary)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2023

Attila Demény*
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
György Czuppon
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
Zoltán Kern
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
István Gábor Hatvani
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
Dániel Topál
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
Máté Karlik
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
Gergely Surányi
Affiliation:
Wigner Research Centre for Physics, ELKH, Budapest, Konkoly-Thege Miklós út 29-33., H-1121 Hungary
Mihály Molnár
Affiliation:
Institute for Nuclear Research, ELKH, Debrecen, Bem square 18/c, H-4026 Hungary
Gabriella Ilona Kiss
Affiliation:
Institute for Nuclear Research, ELKH, Debrecen, Bem square 18/c, H-4026 Hungary High-Precision Mass Spectrometry and Environment Change Laboratory (HISPEC), University of Debrecen, Doctoral School of Physics, 4032 Debrecen, Egyetem tér, 4032 Hungary
Máté Szabó
Affiliation:
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budaörsi út 45, Budapest, H-1112 Hungary Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, MTA Centre of Excellence, Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15–17., H-1121 Hungary
Chuan-Chou Shen
Affiliation:
Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC
Hsun-Ming Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC
Zoltán May
Affiliation:
Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, ELKH, Magyar tudósok körútja 2, Budapest, H-1117 Hungary
*
*Corresponding author email address: demeny@geochem.hu

Abstract

A stalagmite was collected in northern Hungary from the Vacska Cave, where monitoring and ventilation-based site selection had been conducted. The stalagmite covers the 10–8 ka (relative to AD 1950) period, including the so-called 8.2 ka event, and showed preceding signs of climate change that were evaluated by petrographic observations, 14C activities, Sr concentrations, and stable isotope compositions of calcite and inclusion-hosted water. Comparisons of speleothem records show that isotope peaks at ca. 8.5 ka are related to a regional climate anomaly, rather than to a continental-scale event. In accordance with regional proxy records, the 8.2 ka event was associated with a series of temperature and precipitation amount changes, starting with cooling and a reduction in the winter-to-summer precipitation ratio, and then becoming a humid and warm phase at 8.15 ka. X-ray diffraction-based crystallinity parameter (FWHM) values provided evidence for diagenetic alteration of the stable oxygen isotope compositions of inclusion waters. Nevertheless, the stable hydrogen isotope compositions of inclusion waters and the oxygen isotope values of the host calcite revealed elevated d-excess values, and therefore increased Mediterranean moisture contribution during the 8.2 ka event, which indirectly indicate the southward displacement of moisture transport from the Atlantic Ocean.

Type
Thematic Set: Speleothem Paleoclimate
Copyright
Copyright © University of Washington. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2023

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