Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5f95dd588d-lzdw6 Total loading time: 0.686 Render date: 2021-10-28T15:33:04.087Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Holocene History of Desertification along the Woodland-Steppe Border in Northern China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Hongyan Liu
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, People's Republic of China
Lihong Xu
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, People's Republic of China
Haiting Cui
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, People's Republic of China

Abstract

The woodland-steppe ecotone of the southeastern Inner Mongolian Plateau in northern China is located at the northwestern limit of the Pacific monsoon influence, where the landscape may have been a sensitive recorder of past climatic changes. Physical, chemical, and biological analyses of AMS 14C-dated sediment sequences from two lakes of this region were used to reconstruct the Holocene vegetation and desertification history and distinguish four periods: (1) a cold and humid period from 10000 to 8000 14C yr B.P., (2) a warm and humid period from 8000 to 5900 14C yr B.P., (3) a warm and dry period from 5900 to 2900 14C yr B.P., and (4) a cool and dry period from 2900 14C yr B.P. to the present. The increased aridity during the middle Holocene was likely caused by increased winter temperatures and enhanced winter evaporation. The transition from a humid to an arid climate after ∼5900 14C yr B.P. coincided with enhanced aeolian activity, and deciduous woodlands were replaced by pine woodlands and then by steppes in response to the climatic deterioration. These transitions led to the present desertification. The records suggest that a simple association of thermal and moisture conditions, such as warm/wet or cold/dry, may be misleading.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
University of Washington

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

An, Z, Kukla, G.J, Porter, S.C, and Xiao, J Magnetic susceptibility evidence of monsoon variation on the Loess Plateau of central China during the last 130000 years. Quaternary Research 36, (1991). 2936.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Science 241, (1988). 10431952.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cui, H The use of Mulan Hunting Garden and the development of its natural landscape during the Qing Dynasty. Journal of Peking University (1992). 118123.Google Scholar
Cui, H, Liu, H, and Yao, X The finding of the paleo-spruce timber in the Hunshandak sandy land and its paleoecological significance. Science in China D 40, (1997). 599604.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deng, H Environmental changes of Mulan Hunting Garden during the Qing Dynasty. Journal of Peking University (1992). 135142.Google Scholar
Fontes, J.C, Gasse, F, and Gibert, E Holocene environmental changes in Lake Bangong Basin (western Tibet) and stable isotopes of carbonates of a Holocene lacustrine core. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology and Palaeoecology 120, (1996). 2547.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gasse, F, and Van Campo, E Abrupt post-glacial climate events in West Asia and North Africa monsoon domains. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 126, (1994). 435456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guan, Y Chemical elements, clay mineral and depositional environment in Horshin sandy land. Journal of Desert Research (China) 12, (1992). 915.Google Scholar
Hou, H.-Y Physical Geography of China: Phytogeography (II). (1988). Science Press, Beijing.Google Scholar
Jarvis, D.I Pollen evidence of changing Holocene monsoon climate in Sichuan Province, China. Quaternary Research 39, (1993). 325337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ji, J Climatic change in arid areas of China and monsoon fluctuations during past 10k years. Journal of Arid Environments 32, (1996). 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, B., and Wang, J. (1980). Steppe and savanna.. In Vegetation of China Wu, Z.-Y., Ed., pp. 505582. Science Press, Beijing. [In Chinese] Google Scholar
Liu, H Actual Landscape and Landscape Development of the Woodland-Steppe Ecotone at the Southeastern Edge of the Inner Mongolia Plateau. (1998). Peking University, Beijing.Google Scholar
Liu, H, Cui, H, Pott, R, and Speier, M The surface pollen of the woodland-steppe ecotone in southeastern Inner Mongolia, China. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 105, (1999). 237250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, H, Cui, H, Pott, R, and Speier, M The vegetation of the woodland-steppe ecotone in southeastern Inner Mongolia, China. Journal of Vegetation Science 11, (2000). 525532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, H, Cui, H, and Huang, Y Detecting the Holocene movements of woodland-steppe ecotone in northern China using discriminant analysis. Journal of Quaternary Science 16, (2001). 237244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, H, Cui, H, and Yu, P. The origin of remnant forest stands of Pinus tabulaeformis in southeastern Inner Mongolia. Plant Ecology, in press.Google Scholar
Liu, Q, and Li, H Holocene environmental change in Daihai-Huangqihai region. Zhou, T, and Zhang, L Holocene Environmental Changes in the Transitional Zone between Agriculture and Pasture in Northern China. (1992). Geological Publishing House, Beijing. 1650.Google Scholar
Maher, B.A, and Thompsom, R.L Paleorainfall reconstructions from pedogenic magnetic susceptibility variations in the Chinese loess and paleosols. Quaternary Research 44, (1995). 383391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maher, B.A, Thompsom, R.L, and Zhou, L.P Spatial and temporal reconstruction of changes in the Asian palaeomonsoon: A new magnetic approach. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 125, (1994). 461471.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ren, G Migration of the forest-steppe ecotone during the Holocene period in Northeast China. Acta Ecologica Sinica 18, (1998). 3340.Google Scholar
Winstanley, D Desertification: A climatological perspective. Wells, S.G, and Haragan, D.R Origin and Evolution of Deserts. (1983). University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. 185214.Google Scholar
Wu, X, An, Z, Wang, S, Liu, X, Li, X, Zhou, W, Liu, J, Lu, J, Porter, S.C, and Kutzbach, J.E Chronological and spatial development of the summer monsoon in East Asia during the Holocene Optimum Period in China. Quaternary Sciences (China) 1, (1994). 2535.Google Scholar
Xu, H Pinus tabulaeformis . (1990). China Forestry Publishing House, Beijing.Google ScholarPubMed
Xu, X, and Shen, Z Holocene Environment. (1990). Guizhou Renmin Press, Guiyang.Google Scholar
Ye, D, Chou, J, Liu, J, Zhang, Z, and Wang, Y Causes of sandy stormy weather in northern China and control measures. Acta Geographica Sinica 55, (2000). 513521.Google Scholar
Zhang, B The Processes of Human Use and Environmental Changes in the Upper and Middle Reach of the Chao River and the Luan River. (1994). Peking University, Beijing.Google Scholar
Zhou, W, An, Z, and Lin, B Chronology of the Baxie loess profile and the history of monsoon climates in China between 17000 and 6000 years. Radiocarbon 34, (1992). 818825.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
78
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Holocene History of Desertification along the Woodland-Steppe Border in Northern China
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Holocene History of Desertification along the Woodland-Steppe Border in Northern China
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Holocene History of Desertification along the Woodland-Steppe Border in Northern China
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *