Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-d8fc5 Total loading time: 0.231 Render date: 2021-09-21T17:24:12.367Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

PrimeScreen, a brief dietary screening tool: reproducibility and comparability with both a longer food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2007

Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman
Affiliation:
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, 126 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Walter C Willett
Affiliation:
Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA Channing Laboratory, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Rebecca Lobb
Affiliation:
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, 126 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Jamie Kotch
Affiliation:
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, 126 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Charles Dart
Affiliation:
Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Matthew W Gillman*
Affiliation:
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, 126 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author: Email matthew-gillman@hms.harvard.edu
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Objective

Diet is an important determinant of health outcomes, but physicians have few ways to identify persons with suboptimal diets. The purposes of this study were to examine the reproducibility of a short dietary assessment questionnaire (PrimeScreen) and to compare its results with those of a longer food frequency questionnaire and with plasma levels of selected nutrients.

Design

Each subject completed two PrimeScreen questionnaires at an interval of 2 weeks and one full length, 131-item, semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ), and had a sample of blood drawn. We compared the PrimeScreen with two reference standards, the SFFQ and plasma levels of selected nutrients.

Setting

A large managed care organization in New England.

Subjects

A total of 160 men and women, aged 19–65 years, participated.

Results

For foods and food groups, the mean correlation coefficient (r) was 0.70 for reproducibility and 0.61 for comparability with the SFFQ. For nutrients, the mean r was 0.74 for reproducibility and 0.60 for comparability with the SFFQ. No substantial differences were evident by sex, race, body mass index, occupation or education. Correlation coefficients for the comparison of vitamin E, β-carotene and lutein/zeaxanthin intakes from the PrimeScreen with plasma levels were 0.33, 0.43 and 0.43, respectively. These values were similar to those comparing the SFFQ with plasma levels. The median time to complete PrimeScreen was 5 min; 87% of participants required fewer than 10 min.

Conclusions

A quick way to assess quality of diet among adults, PrimeScreen has adequate reproducibility and its results compare well with a longer food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 2001

References

1McGinnis, JM, Foege, WH. Actual causes of death in the United States. JAMA 1993; 270(18): 2207–12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2Willett, WC. Diet and health: what should we eat? Science 1994; 264: 532–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3Russel, MAH, Wilson, C, Taylor, C, Baker, CD. Effect of general practitioners'advice against smoking. BMJ 1979; 2: 231–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4Kelly, RB. Controlled trial of a time-efficient method of health promotion. Am. J. Prev. Med. 1988; 4: 200–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5Glanz, K, Gilboy, MB. Physicians, preventive, and applied nutrition: selected literature. Acad. Med. 1992; 67: 776–81.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6Kottke, TE, Foels, JK, Hill, C, Choi, T, Fenderson, DA. Nutrition counseling in private practice: Attitudes and activities of family physicians. Prev. Med. 1984; 13: 219–25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7Conner, SL, Gustafson, JR, Sexton, G, Becker, N, Artaud-Wild, S, Conner, WE. The diet habit survey: a new method of dietary assessment that relates to plasma cholesterol changes. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 1992; 92: 41–7.Google Scholar
8Knapp, JA, Hazuda, HP, Haffner, SM, Young, EA, Stern, MP. A saturated fat/cholesterol avoidance scale: sex and ethnic differences in a biethnic population. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 1988; 88: 172–7.Google Scholar
9Heller, RF, Pedoe, HDT, Rose, G.A simple method of assessing the effect of dietary advice to reduce plasma cholesterol. Prev. Med. 1981; 10: 364–70.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10Peters, JR, Quiter, ES, Brekke, ML, et al. The Eating Pattern Assessment Tool: a simple instrument for assessing dietary fat and cholesterol intake. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 1994; 94(9): 1008–13.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11Ammerman, AS, Haines, PS, DeVellis, RF, et al. A brief dietary assessment to guide cholesterol reduction in low-income individuals: design and validation. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 1991; 91: 1385–90.Google Scholar
12Lefebvre, RC, Linnan, L, Sundaram, S, Ronan, A.Counseling strategies for blood cholesterol screening programs: recommendations for practice. Patient Educ. Counsel. 1990; 16: 97108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13Block, G, Clifford, C, Naughton, MD, Henderson, M, McAdams, M.A brief dietary screen for high fat intake. J. Nutr. Educ. 1989; 21: 199207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14Serdula, M, Coates, R, Byers, T, et al. Evaluation of a brief telephone questionnaire to estimate fruit and vegetable consumption in diverse study populations. Epidemiology 1993; 4: 455–63.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15Byers, T, Marshall, J, Fiedler, R, Zielezny, M, Graham, S.Assessing nutrient intake with an abbreviated dietary interview. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1985; 122: 4150.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16Shannon, J, Kristal, AR, Curry, SJ, Beresford, SA. Application of a behavioral approach to measuring dietary change: the fat- and fiber-related diet behavior questionnaire. Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 1997; 6(5): 355–61.Google ScholarPubMed
17Cummings, SR, Block, G, McHenry, K, Baron, RB. Evaluation of two food frequency methods of measuring dietary calcium intake. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1987; 126: 796802.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18Angus, RM, Sambrook, PN, Pocock, NA, Eisman, JA. A simple method for assessing calcium intake in Caucasian women. J. Am. Dietet. Assoc. 1989; 89(2): 209–14.Google ScholarPubMed
19Pietinen, P, Hartman, AM, Haapa, E, et al. Reproducibility and validity of dietary assessment instruments. II. A qualitative food-frequency questionnaire. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1988; 128: 667–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20Colditz, GA. The Nurses Health Study: a cohort of US women followed since 1976. J. Am. Med. Wom. Assoc. 1995; 50: 40–4.Google ScholarPubMed
21Ascherio, A, Rimm, EB, Giovannucci, EL, et al. A prospective study of nutritional factors and hypertension among US men. Circulation 1992; 86: 1475–84.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
22Rimm, EB, Giovannucci, EL, Stampfer, MJ, Colditz, GA, Litin, LB, Willett, WC. Reproducibility and validity of an expanded self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire among male health professionals. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1992; 135: 1114–26.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
23Bieri, JG, Brown, ED, Smith, JC Jr. Determination of individual carotenoids in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography. J. Liquid Chromatogr. 1985; 8: 473–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24Motchnik, PA, Frei, B, Ames, BN. Measurement of antioxidants in human blood plasma. Methods Enzymol. 1994; 234: 269–79.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25Kushi, LH, Lew, RA, Stare, FJ, et al. Diet and 20-year mortality from coronary heart disease: The Ireland–Boston diet heart study. New Engl. J. Med. 1985; 312: 811–18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
26Willett, WC, Stampfer, MJ, Underwood, BA, Speizer, FE, Rosner, B, Hennekens, CH. Validation of a dietary questionnaire with plasma carotenoid and α-tocopherol levels. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1983; 38: 631–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
27Ascherio, A, Stampfer, MJ, Colditz, GA, Rimm, EB, Litin, L, Willett, WC. Correlations of vitamin A and E intakes with the plasma concentrations of carotenoids and tocopherols among American men and women. J. Nutr. 1992; 122(9): 1792–801.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access
107
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

PrimeScreen, a brief dietary screening tool: reproducibility and comparability with both a longer food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

PrimeScreen, a brief dietary screening tool: reproducibility and comparability with both a longer food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

PrimeScreen, a brief dietary screening tool: reproducibility and comparability with both a longer food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *