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Patients with bipolar disorders share similar but attenuated prospective memory impairments with patients with schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2012

R. C. K. Chan*
Affiliation:
Neuropsychology and Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China
S. S. Y. Lui
Affiliation:
Neuropsychology and Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China University of ChineseAcademy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China
Y. Wang
Affiliation:
Neuropsychology and Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China
A. C. Y. Liu
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China
W. W. H. Chui
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China
D. H. K. Shum
Affiliation:
Behavioural Basis of Health Research Program, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia
E. F. C. Cheung
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China
*Corresponding
*Address for correspondence: Professor R. C. K. Chan, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 4A Datun Road, Beijing 100101, People's Republic of China. (Email: rckchan@psych.ac.cn)

Abstract

Background

Prospective memory (PM) refers to the ability to remember to carry out an intended action in the future. PM is consistently found to be impaired in individuals with schizophrenia. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia may represent conditions along a continuum, and share similar neurocognitive and genetic architecture. This study aimed to compare the nature and extent of PM impairment in individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Method

Participants were 38 out-patients with schizophrenia and 40 out-patients with bipolar disorder in an early psychosis intervention programme, and 37 healthy controls. Time-, event- and activity-based PMs were assessed using a dual-task laboratory paradigm. Self-reported PM performance was gauged using the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with intelligence quotient (IQ) and education included as covariates, was used to examine group difference on various types of PM. Repeated measures of ANCOVA were used to examine the group × PM type interaction effect. Correspondence between laboratory and self-reported PM measures was examined using correlational analysis.

Results

The group × PM type interaction effect was not significant, but the main effect of group was significant. Patients with schizophrenia and patients with bipolar disorder both performed more poorly than healthy participants in PM. The two clinical groups did not significantly differ in PM. Laboratory and self-reported PM measures did not correlate significantly with each other.

Conclusions

Patients with bipolar disorder shared a similar PM impairment with those with schizophrenia. Findings of this study extended the similarity in neurocognitive impairments between the two psychiatric disorders to PM.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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Patients with bipolar disorders share similar but attenuated prospective memory impairments with patients with schizophrenia
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