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Magnetic resonance imaging in pre-senile dementia of the Alzheimer-type, multi-infarct dementia and Korsakoff's syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

J. E. Christie*
Affiliation:
Brain Metabolism Unit, University of Edinburgh, NMR Imaging Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Edinburgh
D. M. Kean
Affiliation:
Brain Metabolism Unit, University of Edinburgh, NMR Imaging Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Edinburgh
R. H. B. Douglas
Affiliation:
Brain Metabolism Unit, University of Edinburgh, NMR Imaging Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Edinburgh
H. M. Engleman
Affiliation:
Brain Metabolism Unit, University of Edinburgh, NMR Imaging Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Edinburgh
D. St. Clair
Affiliation:
Brain Metabolism Unit, University of Edinburgh, NMR Imaging Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Edinburgh
I. M. Blackburn
Affiliation:
Brain Metabolism Unit, University of Edinburgh, NMR Imaging Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Edinburgh
*
1Address for correspondence: Dr J.E. Christie, MRC Brain Metabolism Unit, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Morningside Park, Edinburgh, EH10 5HF.

Synopsis

Magnetic resonance imaging T1 values in Alzheimer's disease (ATD) were similar to age-matched controls although frontal T1 values tended to increase intraindividually with progression of the dementia. T1 values were raised, in both cortical grey and white matter, in Korsakoff's syndrome and multi-infarct dementia. T1 values appear of little value in studying the neuropathological changes in ATD in relationship to the neuropsychological deficits, but can assist in the differential diagnosis of pre-senile dementia.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

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