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Impact of number of episodes on neurocognitive trajectory in bipolar disorder patients: a 5-year follow-up study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 July 2018

Eva María Sánchez-Morla
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Research Institute of Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), Madrid, Spain CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain CogPsy-Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain
Ana López-Villarreal
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Virgen de La Luz, Cuenca, Spain
Estela Jiménez-López
Affiliation:
CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Virgen de La Luz, Cuenca, Spain Health and Social Research Center, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca, Spain
Ana Isabel Aparicio
Affiliation:
CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Virgen de La Luz, Cuenca, Spain
Vicente Martínez-Vizcaíno
Affiliation:
Health and Social Research Center, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca, Spain Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Talca, Chile
Rodriguez-Jimenez Roberto
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Research Institute of Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), Madrid, Spain CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain CogPsy-Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain
Eduard Vieta
Affiliation:
CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clínic of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain
José-Luis Santos
Affiliation:
CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Virgen de La Luz, Cuenca, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background

The neurocognitive trajectory in bipolar disorder (BD) is variable, with controversial findings, and most evidence come from cross-sectional studies. We aimed to examine the course of neurocognitive functioning in a sample of euthymic BD patients in comparison with a control group during a 5-year follow-up.

Methods

Ninety-nine euthymic bipolar patients and 40 healthy controls were assessed using a comprehensive neurocognitive battery (six neurocognitive domains) at baseline (T1) and then at 5-year follow-up (T2) in a longitudinal study.

Results

No evidence of a progression in neurocognitive dysfunction was found either in cognitive composite index or in any of the neurocognitive domains for the whole cohort. However, there was a negative correlation between number of manic episodes and hospitalisations due to manic episodes and change in neurocognitive composite index (NCI) during the follow-up. Moreover, patients with higher number of manic and hypomanic episodes have a greater decrease in NCI, working memory and visual memory. History of psychotic symptoms was not related to the trajectory of neurocognitive impairment.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that, although the progression of cognitive decline is not a general rule in BD, BD patients who have a greater number of manic or hypomanic episodes may constitute a subgroup characterised by the progression of neurocognitive impairment. Prevention of manic and hypomanic episodes could have a positive impact on the trajectory of cognitive function.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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Impact of number of episodes on neurocognitive trajectory in bipolar disorder patients: a 5-year follow-up study
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