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Liaison-consultation meetings in general practice

An audiotape analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Rebecca J. Tipper
Affiliation:
Dingleton Hospital, Melrose, Roxburghshire TD6 9HN
Ian M. Pullen*
Affiliation:
Dingleton Hospital, Melrose, Roxburghshire TD6 9HN
*
Correspondence
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Abstract

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Aims and method

Audio-recordings were made over a period of six months of liaison–consultation meetings between general practitioners and a community mental health team in the Scottish Borders to show general trends in length of discussion and information exchange.

Results

Meetings were predominantly supportive, with high levels of shared information, but little educational content. Some trends in discussion time are shown.

Clinical implications

Audio-recording could form the basis for reviewing the function of liaison-consultation meetings.

Type
Original papers
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 The Royal College of Psychiatrists

References

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