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Willows in the environment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

Alastair H. C. Sommerville
Affiliation:
Scottish Wildlife Trust, Cramond House, Cramond Glebe Road, Edinburgh EH4 6NS, Scotland, U.K.
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Synopsis

The ecological role of native willows is described in terms of the diverse structure of the species involved, the wide range of plant communities they form and the large numbers of invertebrates associated with them. The conservation importance of the genus Salix is discussed along with comments on the necessary management to retain willow habitats.

Type
Invited papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 1992

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