Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-ts5rl Total loading time: 0.33 Render date: 2021-10-26T09:44:52.199Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Can obesity in early childhood be influenced by lifestyle interventions during pregnancy? A systematic review of the literature

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 December 2017

K. Dalrymple
Affiliation:
Division of Women's Health, King's College London, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, SE1 7EH, UK
J. Martyni-Orenowicz
Affiliation:
Division of Women's Health, King's College London, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, SE1 7EH, UK
M. O'Keeffe
Affiliation:
Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, SE1 9NH, UK
L. Poston
Affiliation:
Division of Women's Health, King's College London, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, SE1 7EH, UK
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2017 

This abstract was awarded the student prize for best poster original communication.

Childhood obesity is rapidly becoming a global pandemic, in 2015 more than 41 million children <5 years were affected by overweight or obesity( 1 ). In the UK, over a fifth of children aged 4–5 years are classified as overweight or obese( 2 ). There is an increasingly convincing body of evidence that obesity in children may have its origins in early life, specifically adverse exposures during in-utero development( Reference Godfrey, Reynolds and Prescott 3 ). Cohort studies have highlighted the association between childhood obesity and increased maternal body mass index (BMI)( Reference Castillo, Santos and Matijasevich 4 , Reference Yu, Han and Zhu 5 ) and excessive gestational weight gain( Reference Yu, Han and Zhu 5 ). Furthermore, observational studies suggest that manipulation of maternal diet and/or physical activity in the antenatal period has the potential to influence offspring growth and development( Reference Nelson, Matthews and Poston 6 ) and this has been shown in experimental animals and their offspring( Reference Zambrano, Martínez-Samayoa and Rodríguez-González 7 ). The maternal population is therefore a target for prevention of childhood obesity, and this has led to a number of randomised controlled trials focusing on lifestyle in pregnancy. However, any lasting causal effect on childhood obesity from these trials is currently unknown.

The objective of this systematic review was to determine whether antenatal lifestyle interventions in pregnant women, aimed at modifying diet and/or physical activity, lead to a reduction in measures of offspring obesity in early childhood.

A systematic review of the literature was completed from 1st January 1990–31st March 2017 in MEDLINE, Embase, and CENTRAL for antenatal interventions with subsequent offspring follow-up publications. A hand search of reference lists and cited articles of relevant reports and review articles was also completed. Electronic searches identified 3361 titles and a further three trials were identified through hand searches. Of these 145 duplicates were removed, 32 abstracts were eligible for full-text review, KD and JMO independently screened the relevant articles, extracted the data and assessed risk of bias.

Seven antenatal lifestyle interventions with offspring follow-up data were identified. Four trials included women from all BMI categories and three trials included obese women only. The antenatal interventions were heterogeneous in terms of intervention design, intensity and outcome measures. For the seven offspring follow-up publications children aged 6 months–7 years, measures of obesity in the offspring (n = 1689) included, weight, BMI, weight-for-length z-scores, skinfold thicknesses and circumferences. Two studies, focusing on obese women only, reported reduced measures of adiposity from 6–12 months (n = 787). The remaining five studies, two from infancy (n = 500) and three (n = 402) from early childhood found no effect on measures of obesity.

For the offspring follow-up studies, there was heterogeneity in methods and variations in reported outcomes and studies were limited due to high rates of attrition. Measures of obesity up to 12 months of age have been shown to be reduced by lifestyle interventions during pregnancy in obese women, however we are unable to draw a conclusion on the influence antenatal interventions have on measures of obesity in early childhood.

References

1. UNICEF, WHO, World Bank (2015) Levels and trends in child malnutrition. New York: UNICEF, Geneva: WHO, Washington DC: World Bank.Google ScholarPubMed
2. Health & Social Care (2016) National Child Measurement Programme 2015/2016. London: NHS.Google Scholar
3. Godfrey, K, Reynolds, R, Prescott, S et al. (2016) Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 5, 5164.Google Scholar
4. Castillo, H, Santos, I, Matijasevich, A (2015) Maternal & Child Nutrition 11, 606617.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Yu, Z, Han, S, Zhu, J et al. (2013) PloS one 8, e61627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Nelson, SM, Matthews, P, Poston, L (2010) Human Reprod Update 16, 225–75.Google Scholar
7. Zambrano, E, Martínez-Samayoa, PM, Rodríguez-González, GL et al. (2010) J Physiol 588, 17911799.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Can obesity in early childhood be influenced by lifestyle interventions during pregnancy? A systematic review of the literature
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Can obesity in early childhood be influenced by lifestyle interventions during pregnancy? A systematic review of the literature
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Can obesity in early childhood be influenced by lifestyle interventions during pregnancy? A systematic review of the literature
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *