Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-mgm4h Total loading time: 0.602 Render date: 2021-06-18T19:24:58.154Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Attending to high and low energy density food related visual cues: does weight status have an impact?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 August 2013

K. J. Doolan
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, UK
G. Breslin
Affiliation:
Ulster Sports Academy, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 OQB, UK
A. M. Gallagher
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, UK
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2013 

Sensitization to food related visual cues may impact on the development and maintenance of obesity( Reference Robinson and Berridge 1 ). Evidence also suggests exposure to high energy density related food cues results in increased motivational salience( Reference Castellanos, Charboneau and Dietrich 2 ). The aim of this study was to investigate differences in body weight status on attentional processing of high energy density and low energy density food images.

Twenty-six normal weight (mean BMI 22.23 (sd 1.85) kg/m2) and twenty-six overweight/obese (mean BMI 29.28 (sd 3.15) kg/m2) individuals aged 18–56 years participated in an eye tracking paradigm in which eye movements to food (classified into high or low energy categories) and non- food images were recorded during both a fasted and fed condition in a counterbalanced design. Duration bias (DB) scores (signifying maintenance of attention) were obtained by calculating the average time (in ms) spent attending to high energy density and low energy density food images as a proportion of the total amount of time spent attending to all images (food and non-food). DB scores >0.5 indicate a bias to look longer at food images, 0.5=no bias and <0.5 indicates a bias towards non-food images( Reference Nijs 3 ).

Using a mixed-design ANOVA, results demonstrated all participants had a bias towards high energy density food images regardless of BMI grouping (normal weight vs. overweight/obese) or condition (fasted vs. fed). In a fasted condition, normal weight (Fig. 1) and overweight/obese (Fig. 2) participants demonstrated a significant bias towards high calorie food images (mean 0.525 (sd 0.08) vs. mean 0.511 (sd 0.08) respectively) and a bias away from low calorie food images (mean 0.488 (sd 0.11) vs. mean 0.488 (sd 0.04) respectively), P=0.023. In a fed condition, both BMI groups also indicated a significant bias towards high calorie food images (mean 0.503 (sd 0.08) vs. mean 0.519 (sd 0.07) respectively) compared to low calorie food images (mean 0.477 (sd 0.07) vs. mean 0.477 (sd 0.06) respectively), P=0.04. No statistically significant effect was observed between BMI groups or satiety conditions (P>0.05) in terms of DB scores.

Figure 1. Normal weight (n26).

Figure 2. Overweight (n26).

Results from this study demonstrate greater attention to high energy density food cues in normal weight and overweight/obese individuals in both a fasting and fed state. Further investigation of eye gaze direction measures are required to draw additional conclusions on how weight status and state of satiation impacts on the attentional processing of food related environmental cues.

References

1. Robinson, TE & Berridge, KC (1993) Annu Rev Psychol 53, 2553.Google Scholar
2. Castellanos, EH, Charboneau, E, Dietrich, MS et al. (2009) Int J Obes 33, 10631073.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Nijs, et al. (2010) Appetite, 54, 243254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Attending to high and low energy density food related visual cues: does weight status have an impact?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Attending to high and low energy density food related visual cues: does weight status have an impact?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Attending to high and low energy density food related visual cues: does weight status have an impact?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *