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A Semi-automated Requirements Reuse and Recycling Process for Autonomous Transportation Systems R&D

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Youssef Damak*
Affiliation:
CentraleSupélec; AKKA Technologies
Marija Jankovic
Affiliation:
CentraleSupélec;
Yann Leroy
Affiliation:
CentraleSupélec;
Karim Chelbi
Affiliation:
AKKA Technologies
*
Contact: Damak, Youssef, CentraleSupélec, Laboratoire Génie Industriel, France, youssef.damak@centralesupelec.fr

Abstract

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The R&D of Autonomous Transportation Systems (ATS) is hindered by the lack of industrial feedback and client's knowledge about technological possibilities. In addition, because of intellectual properties (IP) issues, technology consulting companies can't directly reuse developed functionalities with different clients. In this context, requirements reuse technics presents a good way to capitalize on their knowledge while avoiding IP issues. However, the literature review on requirements reuse processes doesn't propose methods to the application of reuse processes with little information about the system's operational context. In this paper, we present a semi-automated requirement reuse and recycle process for ATS R&D. The process helps designers’ copes with the lack of inputs from the clients. Requirements candidates are retrieved from a database using Natural Language Processing and traceability propagation. It is applied to 3 use cases with inputs less than 5 concepts from the client's needs. The results validate its efficiency through number requirements retrieved and the analysis time consumption

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

References

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