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Consistent Modelling of the Impact Model of Modular Product Structures with Linking Boundary Conditions in SysML

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Abstract

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The challenges related to product structures, which go hand in hand with megatrends such as individualization, can be met with the modularity of product structures. With the help of various modularization methods, modular product structures are created with regard to different goals. There are many references to the effects of modular product structures on life phases and economic targets in the literature. These effects were collected in previous research in a generic impact model. Since there is a lot of information about the effects, such models become very comprehensive and thereby difficult to handle. For this reason, the impact model is consistently generated using SysML. The adaptation to company scenarios is possible through the use of simulations with which, for example, company-related and product-related boundary conditions can be controlled by means of a User Interface.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
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