Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-wlt4x Total loading time: 0.171 Render date: 2021-05-17T05:29:02.109Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

An Inventory of Creative Spaces: Innovative Organizations and their Workspace

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Katja Thoring
Affiliation:
TU Delft, The Netherlands; Anhalt University of Applied Sciences, Germany;
Roland M. Mueller
Affiliation:
Berlin School of Economics and Law, Germany
Petra Badke-Schaub
Affiliation:
TU Delft, The Netherlands;
Pieter Desmet
Affiliation:
TU Delft, The Netherlands;
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Creative workspaces are becoming popular in many organizations. They are believed to support innovation efforts and creativity among employees. This paper presents spatial evidences of creative work environments from real-life organizations, based on an exploratory multi-case study in 18 institutions. The found workspaces were mapped and categorized according to the qualities they might provide for affecting creativity. The resulting inventory of creative spaces contributes to the emerging interest on creative workspace design by presenting inspiring best-practice examples. The shown examples provide the readers with a better understanding how a creative space could be designed in order to provide an environment for an innovative organisation. Related literature was added to explain the possible impact of specific spatial configurations.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

References

Borges, S., Ehmann, S. and Klanten, R. (2013), Work scape. new spaces for new work. Gestalten, Berlin.Google Scholar
Brown, T. (2008), “Design Thinking”, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 86, pp. 8492.Google ScholarPubMed
Bryant, M.E. (2012), “Physical Environments Conducive to Creativity and Collaboration Within the Work Environment” (Master Thesis).Google Scholar
Ceylan, C., Dul, J. and Aytac, S. (2008), “Can the office environment stimulate a manager's creativity?”, Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries, Vol. 18, pp. 589602.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cross, N. (2001), “Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science”, Design Issues, Vol. 17, pp. 4955.Google Scholar
Doorley, S. and Witthoft, S. (2012), Make space: how to set the stage for creative collaboration. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, N.J.Google Scholar
Dudek, M. (2012), Spaces for young children: A practical guide to planning, designing and building the perfect space, 2nd Revised edition. ed. National Children's Bureau Enterprises Ltd, London.Google Scholar
Dul, J. and Ceylan, C. (2011), “Work environments for employee creativity”, Ergonomics, Vol. 54, pp. 1220.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dul, J., Ceylan, C. and Jaspers, F. (2011), “Knowledge workers’ creativity and the role of the physical work environment”, Human Resource Management, Vol. 50, pp. 715734.Google Scholar
Ehmann, S., Borges, S. and Klanten, R. (2012), Learn for life: New architecture for new learning. Gestalten, Berlin.Google Scholar
Georgi, W. and McNamara, C. (2016), The other office 2: Creative workplace design. Frame Publishers, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
Grieco, L. and van Rossum-Willems, M. (2017), The Other Office 3: Creative Workspace Design, 01 ed. Frame Publishers, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
Groves-Knight, K. and Marlow, O. (2016), Spaces for innovation: The design and science of inspiring environments. Frame Publishers, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
Imai, M. (1986), Kaizen: The Key to Japan's Competitive Success, New edition. ed. Mcgraw Hill Book Co, New York.Google Scholar
Kangas, M. (2010), “Creative and playful learning: Learning through game co-creation and games in a playful learning environment”, Thinking Skills and Creativity, Vol. 5, pp. 115.Google Scholar
Kato, I. and Smalley, A. (2012), Toyota Kaizen Methods : Six Steps to Improvement. Productivity Press.Google Scholar
Krafcik, J.F. (1988), “Triumph of the lean production system”, MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol. 30, p. 41.Google Scholar
Kristensen, T. (2004), “The physical context of creativity”, Creativity and innovation management, Vol. 13, pp. 8996.Google Scholar
Lewis, M. and Moultrie, J. (2005), “The organizational innovation laboratory”, Creativity and innovation management, Vol. 14, pp. 7383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lin, S.Y. (2009), Physical Workspace and Creative Performance. Sun Yat-Sen University.Google Scholar
Lindahl, G.A. (2004), “The innovative workplace: An analytical model focusing on the relationship between spatial and organisational issues”, Facilities, Vol. 22, pp. 253258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magadley, W. and Birdi, K. (2009), “Innovation labs: an examination into the use of physical spaces to enhance organizational creativity”, Creativity and innovation management, Vol. 18, pp. 315325.Google Scholar
Martens, Y. (2011), “Creative workplace: instrumental and symbolic support for creativity”, Facilities, Vol. 29, pp. 6379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCoy, J.M. and Evans, G.W. (2005), “Physical work environment”, Handbook of work stress pp. 219245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCoy, J.M. and Evans, G.W. (2002), “The potential role of the physical environment in fostering creativity”, Creativity Research Journal, Vol. 14, pp. 409426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, R., Casey, M. and Konchar, M. (2014), Change Your Space, Change Your Culture: How Engaging Workspaces Lead to Transformation and Growth, 1st ed. John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
Mirchandani, N. (2015), Future schools: Innovative design for existing and new build. Riba Enterprises, Newcastle upon Tyne.Google Scholar
Müller, R.M. and Thoring, K. (2012), “Design thinking vs. lean startup: A comparison of two user-driven innovation strategies”, in: Leading Innovation through Design. pp. 91106.Google Scholar
Oksanen, K. and Ståhle, P. (2013), “Physical environment as a source for innovation: investigating the attributes of innovative space”, Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 17, pp. 11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paoli, D.D. and Ropo, A. (2017), “Creative workspaces – a fad or making real impact?”, Journal of Corp Real Estate, Vol. 19, pp. 157167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paoli, D.D., Sauer, E. and Ropo, A. (2017), “The spatial context of organizations: A critique of ‘creative workspaces.’Journal of Management & Organization pp. 122.Google Scholar
Peschl, M.F. and Fundneider, T. (2014), “Designing and Enabling Spaces for collaborative knowledge creation and innovation: From managing to enabling innovation as socio-epistemological technology”, Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 37, pp. 346359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polanyi, M. (1966), The tacit dimension. Doubleday, Garden City, N.Y.Google Scholar
Ries, E. (2011), The lean startup: how today's entrepreneurs use continuous innovation to create radically successful businesses. Crown Business, New York.Google Scholar
Sarkar, P. and Chakrabarti, A. (2008), “The effect of representation of triggers on design outcomes”, Ai Edam, Vol. 22, pp. 101116.Google Scholar
Sassenberg, K., Moskowitz, G.B., Fetterman, A. and Kessler, T. (2017), “Priming creativity as a strategy to increase creative performance by facilitating the activation and use of remote associations”, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 68, pp. 128138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snead, L. and Wycoff, J. (1999), “Stimulating innovation with collaboration rooms”, Journal for Quality and Participation, Vol. 22, pp. 5557.Google Scholar
Stewart, M. (2004), The other office: Creative workplace design. Frame Publishers, Birkhäuser, Amsterdam; Basel; Boston.Google Scholar
Svihla, V. (2010), “Collaboration as a dimension of design innovation”, CoDesign, Vol. 6, pp. 245262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thoring, K., Desmet, P. and Badke-Schaub, P. (2018a), “Creative environments for design education and practice: A typology of creative spaces”, Design Studies, Vol. 56, pp. 5483.Google Scholar
Thoring, K., Gonçalves, M., Mueller, R.M., Badke-Schaub, P. and Desmet, P. (2017a), “Inspiration Space: Towards a theory of creativity-supporting learning environments”, Proceedings of the Design Management Academy Conference (DMA), Hong Kong, CN, pp. 15391561.Google Scholar
Thoring, K. and Mueller, R.M. (2014), “Spatial Knowledge Management in Design Education”, Proceedings of the Spring Cumulus Conference, Aveiro, Portugal, pp. 581594.Google Scholar
Thoring, K., Mueller, R.M., Badke-Schaub, P. and Desmet, P. (2017b), “A creative learning space development toolkit: empirical evaluation of a novel design method”, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED17), Vancouver, Canada, pp. 245254.Google Scholar
Thoring, K., Mueller, R.M., Badke-Schaub, P. and Desmet, P. (2016), “Design the Campus: Introducing a Toolkit for Developing Creative Learning Spaces”, Proceedings of the Cumulus Conference, Nottingham, UK, pp. 358368.Google Scholar
Thoring, K., Mueller, R.M., Luippold, C., Desmet, P. and Badke-Schaub, P. (2018b), “Co-creating an idea lab: lessons learned from a longitudinal case study”, CERN IdeaSquare Journal of Experimental Innovation, Vol. 2, pp. 3037.Google Scholar
Waber, B., Magnolfi, J. and Lindsay, G. (2014), “Workspaces That Move People”, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 92, pp. 6877.Google ScholarPubMed
Yin, R.K. (2003), Case study research: design and methods. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, Calif.Google Scholar
You have Access
Open access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

An Inventory of Creative Spaces: Innovative Organizations and their Workspace
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

An Inventory of Creative Spaces: Innovative Organizations and their Workspace
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

An Inventory of Creative Spaces: Innovative Organizations and their Workspace
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *