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Large-scale peculiar velocities through the galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 0.1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2016

Martin Feix
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Israel Institute of Technology - Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel email: mfeix@physics.technion.ac.il
Adi Nusser
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Israel Institute of Technology - Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel email: mfeix@physics.technion.ac.il Asher Space Science Institute, Israel Institute of Technology - Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel
Enzo Branchini
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, Rome 00146, Italy INFN Sezione di Roma 3, Via della Vasca Navale 84, Rome 00146, Italy INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone, Italy
Corresponding
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Abstract

Peculiar motion introduces systematic variations in the observed luminosity distribution of galaxies. This allows one to constrain the cosmic peculiar velocity field from large galaxy redshift surveys. Using around half a million galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 7 at z ~ 0.1, we demonstrate the applicability of this approach to large datasets and obtain bounds on peculiar velocity moments and σ8, the amplitude of the linear matter power spectrum. Our results are in good agreement with the ΛCDM model and consistent with the previously reported ~ 1% zero-point tilt in the SDSS photometry. Finally, we discuss the prospects of constraining the growth rate of density perturbations by reconstructing the full linear velocity field from the observed galaxy clustering in redshift space.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2016 

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