Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-9ng7f Total loading time: 0.58 Render date: 2021-06-18T09:53:02.943Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

The infrared environment of methanol maser rings at high spatial resolution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 July 2012

James M. De Buizer
Affiliation:
SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA email: jdebuizer@sofia.usra.edu
Anna Bartkiewicz
Affiliation:
Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Nicolas Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, 87-100, Toruń, Poland
Marian Szymczak
Affiliation:
Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Nicolas Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, 87-100, Toruń, Poland
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

The recent discovery of methanol maser emission coming from ring-like distributions has led to the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high mass stars. In this article we discuss the distribution of circumstellar material around such young and massive accreting (proto)stars, and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for different disk/outflow orientations. For four targets we then compare the expected infrared geometries (as inferred from the properties of the maser rings) with actual high spatial resolution near-infrared and mid-infrared images. We find that the observed infrared emission geometries are not consistent with the masers residing in circumstellar disks.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2012

References

Alvarez, C., Hoare, M., & Lucas, P. 2004, A&A, 419, 203Google Scholar
Bartkiewicz, A., Szymczak, M., van Langevelde, H. J., Richards, A. M. S., & Pihlström, Y. M. 2009, A&A, 502, 155Google Scholar
Chini, R., Hoffmeister, V., Kimeswenger, S., et al. 2004, Nature, 429, 155CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cotera, A. S., Whitney, B. A., Young, E., et al. 2001, ApJ, 556, 958CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cragg, D. M., Sobolev, A. M., & Godfrey, P. D. 2002, MNRAS, 331, 521CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Buizer, J. M. 2006, ApJL, 642, L57CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Buizer, J. M., Piña, R. K., & Telesco, C. M. 2000, ApJS, 130, 437CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Buizer, J. M., Walsh, A. J., Piña, R. K., Phillips, C. J., & Telesco, C. M. 2002, ApJ, 564, 327CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jayawardhana, R., Fisher, R. S., Hartmann, L., et al. 1998, ApJL, 503, L79CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCaughrean, M. J. & O'Dell, C. R. 1996, AJ, 111, 1977CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norris, R. P., Whiteoak, J. B., Caswell, J. L., Wieringa, M. H., & Gough, R. G. 1993, ApJ, 412, 222CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Povich, M. S. & Whitney, B. A. 2010, ApJl, 714, L285CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sako, S., Yamashita, T., Kataza, H., et al. 2005, Nature, 434, 995CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shu, F. H. & Adams, F. C. 1987, IAUS, 122, 7Google Scholar
Stecklum, B. & Kaufl, H. 1998, ESO Press Release, PR 08/98Google Scholar
Telesco, C. M., Decher, R., Becklin, E. E., & Wolstencroft, R. D. 1988, Nature, 335, 51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, Y. & Tan, J. C. 2011, ApJ, 733, 55CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The infrared environment of methanol maser rings at high spatial resolution
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The infrared environment of methanol maser rings at high spatial resolution
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The infrared environment of methanol maser rings at high spatial resolution
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *