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Elemental abundance ratio comparisons of globular clusters, field stars, and dwarf spheroidal galaxies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 December 2005

Barton J. Pritzl
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55105, USA email: pritzl@macalester.edu, venn@macalester.edu
Kim A. Venn
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55105, USA email: pritzl@macalester.edu, venn@macalester.edu
Mike J. Irwin
Affiliation:
Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK email: mike@ast.cam.ac.uk
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Abstract

We have compiled a sample of globular clusters with high-resolution abundances from the literature to compare to the chemistries of stars in the Galaxy and those in dwarf spheroidal galaxies using the [α/Fe] and light r-process element ratios. From existing kinematic data we are able to analyze the populations according to their Galactic components (bulge, thin disk, thick disk, and halo). We find that most globular clusters mimic the Galactic field population arguing for a similar chemical evolution history. Possible extragalactic globular clusters are also noted.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© 2005 International Astronomical Union
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