Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-cn8nj Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2021-09-24T13:30:19.551Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The BinaMIcS project: understanding the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars through close binary systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 January 2015

E. Alecian
Affiliation:
UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, 38041 Grenoble, France, email: evelyne.alecian@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, France
C. Neiner
Affiliation:
LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, France
G. A. Wade
Affiliation:
Dept. of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON, CanadaK7K 0C6
S. Mathis
Affiliation:
LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, France Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM – CNRS – Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France
D. Bohlender
Affiliation:
DAO, CNRC, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7, Canada
D. Cébron
Affiliation:
Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, ISTerre, Grenoble, France
C. Folsom
Affiliation:
LATT – CNRS/Université de Toulouse, 14 Av. E. Belin, Toulouse F-31400, France
J. Grunhut
Affiliation:
ESO, Garching bei München, Germany
J.-B. Le Bouquin
Affiliation:
UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, 38041 Grenoble, France, email: evelyne.alecian@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr
V. Petit
Affiliation:
Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
H. Sana
Affiliation:
ESA/Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
A. Tkachenko
Affiliation:
Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
A. ud-Doula
Affiliation:
Penn State Worthington Scranton, Dunmore, PA 18512, USA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

It is now well established that a fraction of the massive (M > 8 M) star population hosts strong, organised magnetic fields, most likely of fossil origin. The details of the generation and evolution of these fields are still poorly understood. The BinaMIcS project takes an important step towards the understanding of the interplay between binarity and magnetism during the stellar formation and evolution, and in particular the genesis of fossil fields, by studying the magnetic properties of close binary systems. The components of such systems are most likely formed together, at the same time and in the same environment, and can therefore help us to disentangle the role of initial conditions on the magnetic properties of the massive stars from other competing effects such as age or rotation. We present here the main scientific objectives of the BinaMIcS project, as well as preliminary results from the first year of observations from the associated ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimetric surveys.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2015 

References

Barker, A. J. & Ogilvie, G. I. 2009, MNRAS 395, 2268CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bonnell, I. A. & Bate, M. R. 1994, MNRAS 271, 999CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borra, E. F., Landstreet, J. D., & Mestel, L. 1982, ARA&A 20, 191CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Castor, J. I., Abbott, D. C., & Klein, R. I. 1975, ApJ 195, 157CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cébron, D. & Hollerbach, R. 2014, ApJ (Letters) 789, L25Google Scholar
Commerçon, B., Hennebelle, P., & Henning, T. 2011, ApJ (Letters) 742, L9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donati, J.-F. & Landstreet, J. D. 2009, ARA&A 47, 333CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donati, J.-F., Semel, M., Carter, B. D., Rees, D. E. & Collier Cameron, A. 1997, MNRAS 291, 658CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gregory, S. G., Holzwarth, V. R., Donati, J.-F., et al. 2014, in European Physical Journal Web of Conferences, Vol. 64 of European Physical Journal Web of Conferences, p. 8009Google Scholar
Hut, P. 1980, A&A 92, 167Google Scholar
Moss, D. 2001, in Mathys, G., Solanki, S. K., & Wickramasinghe, D. T. (eds.), Magnetic Fields Across the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram, Vol. 248 of Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series, pp 305–+Google Scholar
Neiner, C. & Alecian, E. 2013, in EAS Publications Series, Vol. 64 of EAS Publications Series, pp 75–79Google Scholar
Ogilvie, G. I. & Lin, D. N. C. 2007, ApJ 661, 1180CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parker, E. N. 1960, ApJ 132, 175CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pourbaix, D., Tokovinin, A. A., Batten, A. H., et al. 2009, VizieR Online Data Catalog 1, 2020Google Scholar
Remus, F., Mathis, S., & Zahn, J.-P. 2012, A&A 544, A132Google Scholar
Roxburgh, I. W. 1983, in Stenflo, J. O. (ed.), Solar and Stellar Magnetic Fields: Origins and Coronal Effects, Vol. 102 of IAU Symposium, pp 449–459Google Scholar
Sana, H. & Evans, C. J. 2011, in Neiner, C., Wade, G., Meynet, G., & Peters, G. (eds.), IAU Symposium, Vol. 272 of IAU Symposium, pp 474–485Google Scholar
Taylor, S. F., McAlister, H. A., & Harvin, J. A. 2003, in American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 35 of Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, p. 1342Google Scholar
ud-Doula, A., Owocki, S. P., & Townsend, R. H. D. 2009, MNRAS 392, 1022CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wade, G. A., Grunhut, J., Petit, V., et al. 2013, in Massive Stars: From alpha to OmegaGoogle Scholar
You have Access
9
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The BinaMIcS project: understanding the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars through close binary systems
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The BinaMIcS project: understanding the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars through close binary systems
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The BinaMIcS project: understanding the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars through close binary systems
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *