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The route of absorbed nitrogen to milk protein

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

H. Lapierre
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lennoxville, QC, Canada, J1M 1Z3
R. Berthiaume
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lennoxville, QC, Canada, J1M 1Z3
M. C. Thivierge
Affiliation:
Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada, G1K 7P4
L. Doepel
Affiliation:
Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada, G1K 7P4
D. Pacheco
Affiliation:
AgResearch Ltd, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North, New-Zealand
G.E. Lobley
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Aberdeen, UK, AB21 9SB / Email address: lapierreh@agr.gc.ca
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Extract

Although the efficiency of transfer of N is higher in dairy cows than in growing ruminants, there is still room for improvement as only approximately 30% of the ingested N is recovered in milk protein. The remainder is excreted in faeces (30%) and urine (40%). This review will focus on the metabolic utilisation of the digested N fraction: where in the body is this N partitioned between anabolic (milk protein, tissue growth) and catabolic (urine) fates and what factors influence its efficiency of use?

Type
Invited Papers
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2004

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