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Predicting food intake and performance during adaptation to a new food

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

E.C. Whittemore
Affiliation:
Animal Biology Division, SAC, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, U.K
G.C. Emmans
Affiliation:
Animal Biology Division, SAC, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, U.K
I. Kyriazakis
Affiliation:
Animal Biology Division, SAC, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, U.K
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Extract

Current models that predict food intake over time assume that the animal is always fully adapted to the food that it is on. This approach does not account for the immediate effects of a change in food type upon intake. Such a change may have large effects on intake and performance particularly when the change is to a food of higher bulk content. Such a change initially causes a reduction in intake. Over time, with adaptation, intake gradually increases until a new equilibrium intake is reached. The ability to predict intake and performance during the period of adaptation will allow models to predict food intake on high bulk foods more accurately. Data recorded during the period of adaptation are frequently excluded, perhaps to make the prediction of intake on high bulk foods easier. This work is an attempt to develop a model to predict intake and performance during the adaptation period when an animal is changed to a food of higher bulk content.

Type
Theatre Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2002

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References

Emmans, G.C. 1994. Effective energy: a concept of energy utilisation applied across species. British Journal Nutrition 71: 801821.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kyriazakis, I. and Emmans, G.C. 1995. The voluntary food intake of pigs given feeds based on wheatbran, dried citrus pulp and grass meal, in relation to measurements of feed bulk. British Journal of Nutrition 73: 191 207.Google Scholar
Whittemore, E.C., Kyriazakis, I., Tolkamp, B. and Emmans, G.C. 2001. The short term feeding behavior of growing pigs fed foods differing in bulk content. Physiology and Behavior (submitted).Google Scholar