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Effect of tropical diets on inocula used on in vitro gas production technique

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

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Extract

There is much discussion about the effect of the diet of the inoculum donor animal. The ideal diet should supply microrganisms and they should be able to degrade the feed. But when we evaluate several different feeds by a gas production assay, it is very difficult to feed donor animals with a diet composed by all feeds that will be tested. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of three different tropical diets on inoculum ability to degrade the feeds.

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Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2001

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References

Bueno, I.C.S.; Gobbo, S.P.; Abdalla, A.L. and Cabral Filho, S.L.S. 2000. Effect of solid phase of rumen liquor on the inoculum used for in vitro gas production technique. Proceedings of gas production meeting: fermentation kinetics for feed evaluation and to assess microbial activity . BSAS-EAAP, Wageningen. p.2122.Google Scholar
France, J.; Dhanoa, M.S.; Theodorou, M.K.; Lister, S.J.; Davies, D.R. and Isac, D., 1993. A model to interpret gas accumulation profiles associated with in vitro degradation of ruminant feeds. J. Theor. Biol. 163:99111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ørskov, E.R. & McDonald, I., 1979. The estimation of protein degradability in the rumen from incubation measurements weighted according to the rate of passage. J. Agric. Sci. 92:44953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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