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An assessment of the stress associated with slaughter in sheep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2017

M.H. Anil
Affiliation:
Department of Meat Animal Science, University of Bristol, Langford, BS18 7DY
J. Preston
Affiliation:
Department of Meat Animal Science, University of Bristol, Langford, BS18 7DY
P.D. Warriss
Affiliation:
Department of Meat Animal Science, University of Bristol, Langford, BS18 7DY
R.G. Rodway
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology and Nutrition, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT
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Extract

The Slaughter of Animals (Humane conditions) Act 1990 prohibits killing animals within sight of another. There is a need to produce scientific evidence to show whether the sight of sticking (exsanguination) is stressful to animals that happen to observe this procedure. This has important consequences on the design of stunning and sticking areas in the abattoir. Sticking in a separate are can lead to a delay between stunning and sticking and increase the chance of animals regaining consciousness.

In this study experiments were carried out to determine whether sheep did responded in a way which could suggest they found the experience of witnessing sticking distressing.

Type
Animal welfare
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Production 1991

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References

Anil, M.H., Fordham, D.P. and Rodway, R.G. (1990). Br. Vet. J. 146, 476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fordham, D.P., Lincoln, G.A., Ssewannyana, E. and Rodway, R.G. (1989). Anitn. Prod. 49, 103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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