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Development and Effect of a Pandemic Disaster Training Program for Healthcare Providers from Designated Hospitals for Infectious Patient

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2019

Jiyoung Noh
Affiliation:
Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
Hyun Soo Chung
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
Hye Mi Jin
Affiliation:
Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
Jayoung Hur
Affiliation:
Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
Min Ji Kim
Affiliation:
Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
Chan Mi Kang
Affiliation:
Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
Ga Hyun Lee
Affiliation:
Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
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Abstract

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Introduction:

South Korea experienced Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak in 2015. To mitigate the threat posed by MERS, the Ministry of Health and Center for Disease Control designated hospitals to be responsible for managing any suspected or confirmed infectious patient. These hospitals receive mandatory training in managing infectious patients, but many of the trainings lack practical skills practice and pandemic preparedness exercise.

Aim:

To develop and evaluate a training course designed to train healthcare providers from designated hospitals to enhance their competencies in managing emerging infectious diseases and potential outbreaks.

Methods:

A two-day course was developed by the Center for Disaster Relief, Training, and Research in collaboration with the Korea Health Promotion Institute using Kern’s 6-step approach. The course consisted of didactic lectures, technical skills training, tabletop simulation, and scenario-based simulation. Table-top simulation exercises consisted of cases involving a single infectious patient detected in the outpatient clinic and outbreak in the emergency department. Scenario-based simulation exercises involved managing a critically ill infectious patient in an isolated ward. A post-survey questionnaire was used to evaluate the course and assess the perception changes of the participants. All pre-to-post differences within subjects were analyzed with paired t-tests.

Results:

A total of 121 healthcare providers participated in three separate courses. The competencies for pandemic preparedness knowledge, skills, and attitude improved from pre- to post-course. The differences were all statistically significant (p<0.05). Overall course satisfaction in average for expectation, time, delivery method, and contents were 9.5, 9.2, 9.4, and 9.2, respectively.

Discussion:

There needs to be tests and exercises to recognize gaps of systems in place for pandemic preparedness. Simulation exercises are ideal tools for this purpose. Although this was only a two-day intensive course, this increased familiarity with workflows, tested the coordination of workflows between different disciplines and allowed the identification of gaps.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2019