Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-r9chl Total loading time: 0.432 Render date: 2021-06-21T23:01:48.205Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Synthesis and crystal structure of Co2(OH)2CO3 by Rietveld method

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2012

Shunli Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018, People’s Republic of China
Guanglie Lü
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018, People’s Republic of China
Weihua Tang
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018, People’s Republic of China
Corresponding

Abstract

A new cobalt hydroxide carbonate Co2(OH)2CO3 was successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method. The compound is isomorphous with malachite [Cu2(OH)2CO3] and crystallizes in a monoclinic system [space group P21/a (No. 14); a=9.448(5) Å, b=12.186(9) Å, c=3.188(4) Å, β=98.593°, V=367.143(9) Å3, Z=4, and Dc=3.786(9) g/cm3]. Crystal structure of Co2(OH)2CO3 was refined by the Rietveld method with RP=4.3%, RWP=5.7%, Rexp=5.1%, RB=1.74%, and S=1.117 on the basis of the X-ray powder diffraction data. The crystal structure of Co2(OH)2CO3 obtained by the Rietveld refinement shows that all species Co2+, CO32−, and OH ions occupy C1 site symmetry. Two crystallographically different Co2+ and OH ions and one type CO32− ion exist in the lattice. Co(1) is coordinated to two oxygen atoms from CO32− ions and two OH ions; Co(2) is coordinated to two oxygen atoms from CO32− ions and four OH ions, thus forming a distorted octahedron with (4+2) coordination.

Type
Technical Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Ando, M., Kobayashi, T., Lijima, S., and Haruta, M. (1997). “Optical recognition of CO and H2 by use of gas-sensitive Au-Co3O4 composite films,” J. Mater. Chem.JMACEP 7, 17791783.10.1039/a700125hCrossRefGoogle Scholar
García-Martínez, O., Millan, P., Rojas, R. M., and Torralvo, M. J. (1988). “Cobalt basic salts as inorganic precursors of cobalt oxides and cobalt metal: Thermal behaviour dependence on experimental conditions,” J. Mater. Sci.JMTSAS 23, 13341350.10.1007/BF01154598CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hosono, E., Fujihara, S., Honma, I., and Zhou, H. (2005). “Fabrication of morphology and crystal structure controlled nanorod and nanosheet cobalt hydroxide based on the difference of oxygen-solubility between water and methanol, and conversion into Co3O4,” J. Mater. Chem.JMACEP 15, 19381945.10.1039/b418955hCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, M. G., Dahmen, U., and Searcy, A. W. (1988). “Shape and size of crystalline MgO particles formed by the decomposition of Mg(OH)2,” J. Am. Ceram. Soc.JACTAW 71, C-373C-375.10.1111/j.1151-2916.1988.tb06395.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Llorca, J., Piscina, P. R., Dalmon, J. A., and Homs, H. (2004). “Transformation of Co3O4 during ethanol steam-reforming activation process for hydrogen production,” Chem. Mater.CMATEX 16, 35733578.10.1021/cm049311pCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lorenz, M. and Kempe, G. (1984). “Thermoanalysis of basic cobalt carbonate,” J. Therm. Anal.JTHEA9 29, 581588.10.1007/BF01913467CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lutterotti, L., Matthies, S., Wenk, H. R., Schultz, A. J., and Richardson, J. (1997). “Texture and structure analysis of deformed limestone from neutron diffraction spectra,” J. Appl. Phys.JAPIAU 81, 594600.10.1063/1.364220CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Materials Data, Inc. (1998). JADE 5.0, XRD pattern processing (computer software) ⟨http://www.materialsdata.com/⟩.Google Scholar
McKelvy, M. J., Sharma, R., Chizmeshya, A. V. G., Carpenter, R. W., and Streib, K. (2001). “Magnesium hydroxide dehydroxylation: In situ nanoscale observations lamellar nucleation and growth,” Chem. Mater.CMATEX 13, 921926.10.1021/cm000676tCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Porta, P., Dragone, R., Fierro, G., Inversi, M., Lojacono, M., and Moretti, G. (1992). “Preparation and characterisation of cobalt-copper hydroxysalts and their oxide products of decomposition,” J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans.JCFTEV 88, 311314.10.1039/ft9928800311CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rietveld, H. M. (1967). “Line profile of neutron powder diffraction peaks for structure refinement,” Acta Crystallogr.ACSEBH 22, 151152.10.1107/S0365110X67000234CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robert, R., Romer, S., Reller, A., and Weidenkaff, A. (2005). “Nanostructured complex cobalt oxides as potential materials for solar thermoelectric power generators,” Adv. Eng. Mater.AENMFY 7, 303308.10.1002/adem.200500043CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, G. S. and Snyder, P. L. (1979). “F N: A criterion for rating powder diffraction patterns and evaluating the reliability of powder-pattern indexing,” J. Appl. Crystallogr.JACGAR 12, 6065.10.1107/S002188987901178XCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stoilova, D., Koleva, V., and Vassileva, V. (2002). “Infrared study of some synthetic phases of malachite (Cu2(OH)2CO3)-hydrozinref (Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2) series,” Spectrochim. Acta, Part ASAMCAS 58, 20512059.10.1016/S1386-1425(01)00677-1CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wang, S. L., Qian, L. Q., Xu, H., , G. L., Dong, W. J., and Tang, W. H. (2009). “Synthesis and structural characterization of cobalt hydroxide carbonate nanorods and nanosheets,” J. Alloys Compd.JALCEU 476, 739743.10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.09.096CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, Y. X., Zhang, Y. J., Cao, Y. M., Lu, M., and Yang, J. H. (2008). “Properties of exchange biased Co/Co3O4 bilayer films,” J. Alloys Compd.JALCEU 450, 128130.10.1016/j.jallcom.2007.05.030CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xu, R. and Zeng, H. C. (2003). “Dimensional control of cobalt-hydroxide-carbonate nanorods and their thermal conversion to one-dimensional arrays of Co3O4 nanoparticles,” J. Phys. Chem. BJPCBFK 107, 1264312649.10.1021/jp035751cCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yuan, Z. Y., Huang, F., Feng, C. Q., Sun, J. T., and Zhou, Y. H. (2003). “Synthesis and electrochemical performance of nanosized Co3O4,” Mater. Chem. Phys.MCHPDR 79, 14.10.1016/S0254-0584(02)00442-XCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhao, Z. G., Geng, F. X., Bai, J. B., and Cheng, H. M. (2007). “Facile and controlled synthesis of 3D nanorods-based urchinlike and nonosheets-based flowerlike cobalt basic salt nanostructures,” J. Phys. Chem. CJPCCCK 111, 38483852.10.1021/jp067320aCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zigan, F., Joswig, W., Schuster, H. U., and Mason, S. A. (Report No. 100150) (1977). “Verfeinerung der Struktur von MalachitCu2(OH)2CO3, durch Neutronenbenbeugung,” Zeit. Krist. 145, 412426.Google Scholar
4
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Synthesis and crystal structure of Co2(OH)2CO3 by Rietveld method
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Synthesis and crystal structure of Co2(OH)2CO3 by Rietveld method
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Synthesis and crystal structure of Co2(OH)2CO3 by Rietveld method
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *