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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 December 2012

Karen Celis
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Amy G. Mazur
Affiliation:
Washington State University

Extract

Four decades after publication, Hanna Pitkin's The Concept of Representation (1967), continues to resonate with scholars of representation and democratic performance. Many contemporary empirical and theoretical studies of politics begin and/or end with Pitkin's seminal taxonomy of representation (formal, symbolic, descriptive, and substantive representation); her definitions of these different forms of representation; or her conceptualizations of the relationships between the representative and the represented. This classic work still seems to provide some of the crucial tools and concepts for analyses and critiques that focus on the way in which and the extent to which policy decisions and deliberative processes relate to society.

Type
Critical Perspectives on Gender and Politics
Copyright
Copyright © The Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association 2012

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References

Celis, Karen. 2008. “Gendering Representation.” In Politics, Gender and Concepts: Theory and Methodology, eds. Gary, Goertz and Mazur, Amy. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 7193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Childs, Sarah, and Lovenduski, Joni. 2013. “Political Representation.” In The Oxford Handbook on Gender and Politics, eds. Waylen, Georgina, Celis, Karen, Kantola, Johanna, and Weldon, Laurel. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hancock, Marie Ange, and Simien, Evelyn. 2011. “Mini Symposium: Intersectionality Research.” Political Research Quarterly 64 (1): 185243.Google Scholar
McBride, Dorothy, and Mazur, Amy. 2010. The Politics of State Feminism. Innovation in Comparative Research. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
Mansbridge, Jane. 2011. “The Concepts of Representation.” American Political Science Review 105 (3): 631–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mazur, Amy G. 2002. Theorizing Feminist Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rehfeld, Andrew. 2011. “Clarifying the Concept of Representation.” American Political Science Review 105 (3): 621–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwindt-Bayer, Leslie A., and Taylor-Robinson, Michelle M.. 2011. “Critical Perspectives: The Meaning and Measurement of Women's Interests.” Politics & Gender 7 (3): 417–46.Google Scholar
Weldon, Laurel. 2002. “Beyond Bodies: Institutional Sources of Representation for Women in Democratic Policymaking.” Journal of Politics 64 (4): 1153–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weldon, Laurel. 2008. “Intersectionality.” In Politics, Gender and Concepts: Theory and Methodology, eds. Gary, Goertz, and Mazur, Amy. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 193218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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