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Response to “Revisiting the Influence of Campaign Tone on Turnout in Senate Elections”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2017

Kim L. Fridkin
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, Arizona State University, CLAS, Tempe, AZ 85287-3902. e-mail: fridkin@asu.edu (corresponding author)
Patrick J. Kenney
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, Arizona State University, CLAS, Tempe, AZ 85287-3902. e-mail: pkenney@asu.edu

Extract

Robert Jackson and Jason Sides (2005) conclude in their article, Revisiting the Influence of Campaign Tone on Turnout in Senate Elections, “We are hard-pressed to conclude that respondents' political profiles condition the influence of campaign tone on their turnout behavior.… Kahn and Kenney's conclusions about differential citizen responsiveness to campaign negativity should not become part of accepted wisdom in this area of scholarship.” We disagree and our reasoning rests on three points: the measurement and operationalization of a key variable: mudslinging; the selection of an appropriate estimation strategy; and the employment of theoretical expectations to make sense of the central findings.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Political Methodology 

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